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Design Studies

Design Studies

Textile and Apparel Design Major
   Textile and Apparel Design, Senior Year at UW-Madison Option
   Requirements for the Major
   Textile and Apparel Design, Senior Year at F.I.T. Option
   Requirements for the Major
Interior Design Major
   Requirements for the Major
Certificate Programs
Courses

1300 Linden Drive, Room 234, Madison, WI 53706; 608-262-2651; ds@mail.sohe.wisc.edu; www.sohe.wisc.edu/etd

Effective January 2010: Sterling Hall, 475 North Charter Street, Room 2402 (move date to be determined)

Professors Boyd, Dong, Gordon, Hunt, Rengel, Sarmadi, Sheehan (chair); Associate Professors Angus, Nelson; Assistant Professors Chopra, Hark, Kallenborn, Shin

Design Studies  (DS) offers multidisciplinary education in design and research of interior design environments and textiles and apparel, through participation in formal classroom instruction and ongoing research and scholarly endeavors. Students benefit from a broad-based program and a faculty specializing in areas such as design visualization, environment and behavior studies, history of interiors and textiles, interior design and interior architecture, material culture, textile and apparel design, and textile science.

Two undergraduate majors are offered: (1) interior design and (2) textile and apparel design. DS also offers a Human Ecology: Design Studies graduate program (see the Graduate School Catalog for further information).

The interior design (ID) major prepares students for professional careers demanding knowledge of designed facility spaces and products. Career placement of graduates ranges from corporate business, to professional firms, to industry and governmental agencies.

The textile and apparel design (TAD) major offers the opportunity to channel creative thinking into challenging careers in the multifaceted textile and apparel field. TAD graduates find positions both nationally and internationally in a wide range of settings from industry to small business.

Student internships in both majors augment campus course offerings, providing students with unique learning opportunities in their chosen fields. Design studies majors have access to design resources: studios, a computer laboratory equipped to support design work; textile laboratories including a testing room; an interior design resource room, the Design Gallery, the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection, and the Ruth Ketterer Harris Library. In addition, a strong collaborative environment exists for students and faculty interaction with other departments, institutes, and museums on the campus and other design programs within the state and country.

On-campus students interested in learning about program admissions should contact the Student Academic Affairs Office (acadaffairs@mail.sohe.wisc.edu; 608-262-2608) to register for a "Becoming a SoHE Student" session. For application deadlines and procedures for SoHE programs, see Prospective/Transfer Students. For application forms, curriculum check-sheets, and program-specific information, see Student Academic Affairs Office Forms.

Textile and Apparel Design Major

The textile and apparel design (TAD) undergraduate major includes aspects of art, design and technology within a curriculum intended to develop creativity and problem solving skills. Additional academic courses in humanities, science and social studies provide students with the knowledge base and experience necessary to succeed in a variety of careers in textile and apparel design. Graduates have the option to become designers for industry, independent artists or entrepreneurs.

Students may spend their final year of study either at UW-Madison or at the Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) in New York City, where they participate in a visiting student program. Upon graduation, students who attend F.I.T. are awarded a B.S. degree from UW-Madison in Textile and Apparel Design and an A.A.S. degree from F.I.T. Students attending F.I.T. who are considered Wisconsin nonresidents continue to pay out-of-state tuition, even if they reside in the state of New York.

Freshmen should declare their intention to pursue the textile and apparel design major when they apply for admission to UW-Madison. On-campus transfer students must have a 2.75 grade point average (GPA) in order to enter the program. The program is designed to be completed in four academic years. For transfer students, sequential courses and courses taught only once a year should be taken into account when calculating time toward completion of the degree, as graduation time may be extended.

All students must complete a one-year, 12-credit Phase I curriculum, which begins each fall semester. Upon completing Phase I of the program, students apply for admission into Phase II. Admission into Phase II occurs once a year, and is based on a student's grade point average in Phase I course work and the availability of space.

All textile and apparel design majors submit a portfolio in November of their third year in the program. Students with a 3.0 or higher grade point average in December of the same year may apply to the  F.I.T. option for their final year of study. Their recommendation based on portfolio evaluations will be sent with their application to F.I.T. in December.  For those students who choose to spend their senior year in Madison, the third-year portfolio review forms the basis for determining an appropriate senior capstone experience.

Textile and Apparel Design, Senior Year at UW-Madison Option

Requirements for the Major

The academic requirements for this major are:

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

General education requirements (GER) must be met by all students.

GENERAL STUDIES, 40 credits
Math & Communication

Math 101 (unless exempt), 0-4 cr
Speech Communication (Com Arts 100, 105, 181, or L Sc Com 100), 2-3 cr

Arts & Humanities, 12 credits

Literature, 3 cr
Art Hist, 3 cr
Other Arts & Humanities to bring total to 12 cr

Social Studies, 9 credits

Courses designated S, Y or Z in the Schedule of Classes (Timetable), with distribution across two or more departments (e.g., Soc and Anthro).

Biological, Natural, and Physical Sciences, 9 credits

Courses designated B, N, P, X or W with a distribution across two or more areas (e.g., one B course and one P course).

SoHE Breadth, 3 credits

3 credits of Human Ecology courses outside of department (HDFS, LS Com, Inter-HE, Nutri Sci, Food Sci).

TEXTILE AND APPAREL DESIGN COURSES
Phase I Core, 12 credits

DS120 Design Fundamentals I, 3 cr
DS 501 Introduction to Textile Design, 3 cr
DS 153 Fabric and Apparel Structures I, 3 cr
DS 251 Textile Science, 3 cr

Design History, 6 credits

Select two courses (3 credits):
DS 355 History of Fashion, 1400-present
DS 420 Twentieth Century Design
DS 421 History of European Interiors
DS 422 History of American Interiors
DS 430 History of Textiles
DS 640 Ethnographic Textiles
DS 642 Taste
DS 655 Comparative World Dress

Studio and Theoretical Experience, 7-8 credits

Art 112 Drawing I, 3 cr
Art 508 Colloquium in Art, 1 cr

Select one course (3-4 credits):
Art 104 Three Dimensional Design
Art 108 Foundations of Contemporary Art
Art 208 Current Directions in Art
Art 212 Drawing II
Art 214 Sculpture I
Art 224 Art Metal I
Art 306 Relief Printmaking
Art 334 Woodworking
Art 336 Serigraphy
Art 354 Glassworking
Art 418 Installation & Environments
Art 466 Papermaking, His, Elem and Techs
Theatre 163 Fundamentals of Costume Design
Theatre 363 Principle and Practice of Stage Costume
Theatre 464 Costume Technology Topics
Theatre 472 Scenic Painting

Select one course (3-4 credits):
Art 302 Color
DS 451 Color Theory and Technology
DS 520 Color Theory: Environmental Context

Textile and Apparel Design Studios, 27 credits

Select 9 courses with attention to prerequisites:
DS 154 Fabric and Apparel Structures II
DS 210 Fashion Illustration
DS 225 Apparel Design I
DS 226 Off Loom Construction
DS 227 Printing and Dyeing I
DS 229 Weaving I
DS 253 Patternmaking for Apparel Design
DS 327 Manual/Computer Generated Imagery
DS 425 Apparel Design II
DS 427 Printing and Dyeing II
DS 428 Structural Enrichment II
DS 429 Weaving II
DS 528 Experimental Textile Design
DS 625 Apparel Design III

Individualized Focus, 12 credits

A selection of courses intended to develop depth in an individually designed focus area to help in preparing for a future career. These courses may be taken in other departments such as Theatre and Drama, Business, Environmental Studies, or any other area of interest. Credits may lead to a certificate in an area of study such as material culture or business. Course selection must be pre-approved by your faculty mentor.

Senior Capstone Experience

Students will submit a portfolio in the fall semester preceding the final year in the program, on which the senior thesis and individualized focus area will be determined.

DS 601 Internship, 3 cr
DS 681 Senior Honors Thesis 2-4 cr or
DS 691 Senior Thesis, 2 cr
DS 501 Advance Undergraduate Studio Research Seminar, 3 cr

Electives to meet the 120-credit graduation requirement

Textile and Apparel Design, Senior Year at F. I. T. Option

Requirements for the Major

The academic requirements for this major are:

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

General education requirements (GER) must be met by all students

GENERAL STUDIES, 40 credits
Math & Communication

Math 101 (unless exempt), 0-4 cr
Speech Communication (Com Arts 100, 105, 181, or L Sc Com 100), 2-3 cr

Arts & Humanities, 12 credits

Literature, 3 cr
Art History, 3 cr
Other Arts & Humanities to bring total to 9 cr

Social Studies, 9 credits

Courses designated S, Y or Z in the Schedule of Classes (Timetable), with distribution across two or more departments (e.g., Soc and Anthro).

Biological, Natural, and Physical Sciences, 9 credits

Courses designated B, N, P, X or W with a distribution across two or more areas (e.g., one B course and one P course).

SoHE Breadth, 3 credits

3 credits of Human Ecology courses outside of department (HDFS, L Sc Com, Inter-HE, Nutri Sci, Food Sci).

TEXTILE AND APPAREL DESIGN COURSES

DS 120 Design Fundamentals I, 3 cr
DS 153 Fabric and Apparel Structures I, 3 cr
DS 251 Textile Science, 3 cr
DS 501 Introduction to Textile Design, 3 cr

Design History, 6 credits

Select 2 courses:
DS 355 History of Fashion, 1400-present, 3 cr
DS 420 Twentieth century Design, 3 cr
DS 421 History of European Interiors, 3 cr
DS 422 History of American Interiors, 3 cr
DS 430 History of Textiles, 3 cr
DS 640 Ethnographic Textiles, 3 cr
DS 642 Taste
DS 655 Comparative World Dress, 3 cr

Studio and Theoretical Experience, 7-8 credits

Art 112 Drawing I, 3 cr
Art 508 Colloquium in Art, 1 cr

Select one course (3-4 credits):
Art 104 Three Dimensional Design
Art 108 Foundations of Contemporary Art
Art 208 Current Directions in Art
Art 212 Drawing II
Art 214 Sculpture I
Art 224 Art Metal I
Art 306 Relief Printmaking
Art 334 Woodworking
Art 336 Serigraphy
Art 354 Glassworking
Art 418 Installation and Environments
Art 466 Papermaking, His, Elem and Techs
Theatre 163 Fundamentals of Costume Design
Theatre 363 Principle and Practice of Stage Costume
Theatre 464 Costume Technology Topics
Theatre 472 Scenic Painting

Color, 3-4 credits

Select one course:
Art 302 Color
DS 451 Color Theory and Technology
DS 520 Color Theory: Environmental Context

Textile and Apparel Design Studies, 21 credits

Select 7 courses with attention to prerequisites (3-4 credits):
DS 154 Fabric and Apparel Structures II*
DS 210 Fashion Illustration
DS 225 Apparel Design I*
DS 226 Off Loon Construction
DS 227 Printing and Dyeing I
DS 229 Weaving I
DS 253 Patternmaking for Apparel Design*
DS 327 Manual/Computer Generated Imagery
DS 425 Apparel Design II
DS 427 Printing and Dyeing II
DS 428 Structural Enrichment II
DS 429 Weaving II
DS 625 Apparel Design III
DS 628 Experimental Textile Design

*For students who want to pursue the Fashion Design major at F.I.T., DS 225 is required. DS 154 and DS 253 are prerequisites for DS 225.

State University of New York/Fashion Institute of Technology Visiting Student Program
SENIOR YEAR AT F.I.T.

Students will submit a portfolio in the fall semester before the final year in the program for which placement in a one-year associate degree program at F.I.T. will be based on an evaluation of the portfolio submitted to the Textile & Apparel Design Review Committee. A 3.0 minimum GPA is required for admission into F.I.T. Students must take electives to meet the 120-credit graduation requirement.

Fashion Design Major, 34.5 credits

Semester I
AP 107 Apparel Design, 4 cr
AP 108 Apparel Design, 5 cr
AP 121 Flat Pattern Design, 2 cr
AP 148 Design Room Procedures, 2 cr
AP 113 Fashion Art and Design, 5 cr
FA 105 Life Drawing, 1.5 cr

Semester II

AP 221 Flat Pattern Designs, 2 cr
Choice Specialization-Apparel, 4 cr
AR 131 Fabric Studies: Art, 1 cr
AR 182 Flats and Specs, 1.5 cr
CL 112 Faces and Places in Fashion and Arts, 1 cr
TS 131 Textile Prin. for Fashion Designers, 3 cr

Textile / Surface Design Major, 30.5 credits

Semester I

SD 112 Color Fundamentals (or substitute), 2 cr
SD 125 Print Design/Apparel, 5 cr
SD 155 Decorative Fabrics, 2 cr
SD 185 Screen Printing, 2 cr
SD 137 Woven Design, 5 cr
SD 141 Nature Studies, 1.5 cr

Semester II

SD 133 Painted Woven Design, 1.5 cr
SD 221 Print Design/Apparel, 3 cr
SD 224 CAD Adv. Print Design, 1.5 cr
TD 133 CAD for Woven Design, 1.5 cr
SD 252 Decorative Fabrics and Wallcoverings, or
SD 282 Screen Printing
TD 233 Woven Design, 3 cr
TS 11 Textile Fundamentals, 3 cr

Semester I

LD 111 Leather and Materials Technology, 2.5 cr
LD 121 Accessory Design/Human Anatomy, 1.5 cr
LD 133 Footwear Design/Construction I, 3 cr
LD 143 Handbag Design/Construction I, 3 cr
LD 165 Sketching Accessories, 2.5 cr
FA 104 Sculpture, 1.5 cr
SD 141 Nature Studies, 1.5

Semester II

LD 133 Footwear Design/Construction II, 3 cr
LD 143 Handbag Design/Construction II, 3 cr
LD 225 Introduction to Line Building, 2.5 cr
LD 243 Belts: Design and Pattern, 1.5 cr
LD 293 Developing a Portfolio, 3 cr
PH 272 Image Design with Photoshop, 2 cr

Electives to meet the 120-credit graduation requirement

Interior Design Major

The undergraduate major in interior design is a four-year professional program accredited by the Council of Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) and leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Design. The program develops students' creativity in the design and planning of interior spaces by emphasizing the process and communication of design. Students learn to integrate the art of design with the social sciences concerning the interaction of people and their environment, the history of design, and the physical sciences relating to the effects of materials on the physical health and comfort of inhabitants. Insight into professional practice is enhanced through internship experiences.

Faculty maintain scholarly programs of study in design and research that form the basis of the graduate program and enrich the undergraduate program through course work, design review, and student mentoring.

Course content helps students develop communication skills such as sketching, rendering, computer-aided drafting and design, and three-dimensional modeling with exposure to both residential and commercial interiors. In addition, courses in art history, history of interiors, business, engineering, and art are required. A final portfolio is required before graduation. Studio spaces for student use, a resource center containing catalogs and samples, plus a lighting demonstration area and computer laboratory provide physical support for the interior design curriculum.

Students who wish to pursue the interior design major begin in Phase I (pre-professional interior design course sequence) of the program. Advancement into Phase II (professional interior design course sequence) is competitive and involves an application process that occurs once a year, at the end of the fall semester. Admission is based upon evaluation of a student's performance in Phase I of the curriculum. This includes a minimum of 18 credits from designated general university courses (i.e., arts and humanities, science, and social studies), and 15 credits of designated design-related courses. Students interested in interior design may enroll in the School of Human Ecology during the freshman year. Transfer students may take longer to complete their degree than students entering the program as freshmen, as they too must complete both Phase I and Phase II, which contain specialized courses that must be taken sequentially. Transfer students will need to have their records reviewed to determine whether prior course work may fulfill program requirements.

After completing Phase I of the program and upon acceptance into Phase II, all interior design students must purchase a laptop computer based on minimum hardware specification and software licenses determined by the department and updated regularly. Students also have the option, but are not required, to purchase a laptop computer before completion of Phase I of the program.

Requirements for the Major

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

General education requirements must be met by all students.

GENERAL STUDIES, 40 credits
Math & Communication

*Math 112 or 141 (unless exempt), 0-4 cr
*Speech Communication (Com Arts 100, 105, 181 or L Sc Com 100), 2-3 cr

Art and Humanities, 12 credits

*Literature, 3 cr
Art Hist 201 or 202, 4 cr
Art Hist 208 or an architectural art history course, 3-4 cr.
**Art 112, 3 cr

Social Studies, 9 credits

*Econ 101 or AAE 215, 3 cr
*Psych 202, 3 cr
*Any Sociology or Cultural Anthropology course, 3 cr

Biological, Natural, and Physical Sciences, 9 credits

*Science choice (Physics course recommended), 3 cr
*Biological Science (Anthro 105 or 107 recommended), 3 cr
**ME 160 Architectural Graphics, 3 cr
(ME 160 is also listed under Phases I Design Core. Credits count only once toward the 120 credits required for graduation.)

SoHE Breadth, 3 credits

3 credits of School of Human Ecology courses outside the major—Csnr Sci, DS (TAD course), HDFS, L Sc Com, Inter-HE, Nutri Sci, Food Sci.

Pre-ID Curriculum. Students majoring in interior design must apply for admission to the professional course sequence. Before applying they must complete:

  • a minimum of 18 general studies credits selected from those courses with an asterisk (*);
  • the five courses (15 credits) comprising the Pre-ID Phase I Design Core with two asterisks (**).

Phase I: Design Core, 15 credits

**DS 120 Design Fundamentals I, 3 cr
**DS 220 Design Fundamentals II, 3 cr
**DS 221 Person and Environment Interactions, 3 cr
**Art 112 Drawing I, 3 cr
**ME 160 Architectural Graphics, 3 cr

Phase II: Professional Course Sequence, 47 credits

Interior Design Core, 25 credits
DS 222 Interior Design I, 4 cr
DS 223 Interior Architectural Design, 3 cr
DS 322 Interior Design II, 4 cr
DS 601 Internship, 3 cr
DS 622 Interior Design III, 4 cr
DS 623 Interior Design IV, 4 cr
DS 624 Portfolio Preparation, 3 cr

Textiles and Materials, 6 credits
DS 251 Textile Science, 3 cr
DS 561 Textile Specifications and End Use Analysis, 3 cr

Design Visualization, 10 credits
DS 320 Sketching and Rendering, 4cr
DS 323 Computer Aided Design: Architecture and Interiors, 3 cr
DS 520 Color Theory: Environmental Context or
DS 451 Color Theory and Technology or
Art 302 Color, 3 cr

Design History, 6 credits
Complete 6 credits from any two of the following courses:
DS 363 American Decorative Arts and Interiors, 3 cr
DS 420 20th Century Design, 3 cr
DS 421 History of European Interiors, 3 cr
DS 422 History of American Interiors, 3 cr

Business, 6 credits

Gen Bus 301 Business Law, 3 cr
Business Elective, 3 cr

Sustainable Design, 3 credits

Courses listed below are intended to provide guidance in course selection, but other courses may be used with faculty mentor approval.

Civ Eng 649, Sustainable Energy Building Design, 3 cr
DS 356, Sustainable Residential Construction, 3 cr
Gen Bus 365, Business and Social Side of Sustainability, 3 cr
Gen Bus 600, Environmental Strategy and Sustainability, 3 cr

Design Depth/Focus, 6 credits

In consultation with the major advisor or faculty mentor, students select 6 credits of courses that will add breadth or depth to their design studies. Approval is required for courses selected to fulfill this requirement. Courses may be found in DS or other departments across campus such as art, engineering, landscape architecture, art history, theatre, business, and journalism, among others.

ID Major Courses Taken during Phase I.

Upon completing Phase I of the program, students apply for admission into Phase II, which begins with DS 222 Interior Design I. Admission into Phase II occurs once a year, and is based upon a student's grade point average in Phase I course work and the availability of space.

* 18 credits selected from the asterisked courses in the General Studies section, which includes GER Communication A. See asterisked (*) courses above.

** These 15 credits of design-related requirements: DS 120, DS 220, and DS 221, Art 112, ME 160 (Art 102 and 104 are accepted substitutes for DS 120 and DS 220 respectively).

Electives and additional courses required in art history, business, art, human ecology, and DS may be taken while completing Phase I of the program, thus advancing a student's progress towards completing the major.

Transfer students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.75 to enter Phase I. All students are strongly advised to meet with the assigned academic advisor to plan the program of study and focus area selection.

Electives to meet minimum total of 120 degree credits

Certificate Programs

Certificate programs are optional and are not required for graduation. Several UW-Madison-sponsored programs may be relevant to design studies students include:

The textile science certificate is a non-transcripted certificate in the interior design program. The three courses encompass the study of the production of textile fibers and conversion of them into yarns and fabrics, dyeing and finishing of the textile products, color measurement and color matching. For additional information, see Textile Science Certificate.

The material cultures certificate examines forms, uses, and meanings of objects, images, and environments in everyday life. Undergraduate students in the program sample courses across departments such as Art History, Design Studies and History, as they build on their department majors. For additional information, see Material Culture Program.

The certificate in business (CIB) program provides nonbusiness students the opportunity to earn a concentration in a clearly defined academic program in business. For additional information, see CIB Program.