Home < Schools, Colleges, and Programs < College of Letters & Science < Majors, Certificates, and Concentration Programs < Social Work

College of Letters and Science

Social Work/Social Welfare

Mission
Undergraduate Degree Programs
Advising
Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science—Major in Social Welfare
Bachelor of Social Work
Field Education for BSW Students
Undergraduate Social Work Field Units
Social Science Concentration Courses Approved for Social Welfare Majors and BSW Students
Honors in the Major
Certificate Programs
Accreditation
Graduate School
Courses

1350 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706; 608-263-3660; socwork.wisc.edu

Professors Berger, Brower, Cancian, Greenberg, Kramer, Mailick, Meyer, Robert, Slack; Associate Professors Curtis,  Haley-Lock, Magnuson, Moses, Schroepfer Assistant Professors  Gattis, Glass, Walsh, Xiong; Clinical Assistant Professors Conn, Imungi, Yackovich; Lecturer Lock

Academic advisors: Mary Paulauskis, paulauskis@wisc.edu (Room 326); Belinda Velazquez, bvelazqu@wisc.edu (Room 323)

Access and accommodation resource coordinator (AARC): William Heiss, waheiss@wisc.edu
Sexual harassment liaison: Tracy Schroepfer, tschroepfer@wisc.edu

Social work's special contribution rests on an established body of knowledge, values and skills pertinent to understanding human relationships and the interaction between people as individuals, in families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Undergraduates in the School of Social Work receive a liberal arts education in the social and behavioral sciences and their application to human problems that prepares them to be informed citizens involved in human services or social welfare problems and policies. Students take courses in a variety of social sciences to enable them to view social welfare in its broad social, economic, and political contexts.

Social work courses offer a theoretical understanding of social problems and an introduction to practice methods used by social workers. The curriculum covers such areas as aging, family and child welfare, poverty, mental health, developmental disabilities, alcohol and drug abuse, diversity, race and ethnicity, criminal justice, oppression and social, economic and environmental justice, and at-risk populations.

Mission

The mission of the UW–Madison School of Social Work is to enhance human well-being and promote human rights and social and economic justice for people who are disadvantaged to achieve an equitable, healthy, and productive society. The school aims to:

  • Create, advance, strengthen, and integrate interdisciplinary knowledge for students and the profession through research, scholarship, teaching and practice.
  • Educate students to become highly skilled, culturally competent and ethical practitioners who will provide effective leadership for the profession of social work within the State of Wisconsin, nationally, and internationally.
  • Promote change at levels ranging from the individual to national and international policy, including empowering communities and populations that are disadvantaged and developing humane service delivery systems.
  • Create and disseminate knowledge regarding the prevention and amelioration of social problems.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

The School of Social Work offers a bachelor of social work (BSW) degree or a bachelor of arts (B.A.) or bachelor of science (B.S.) degree with a major in social welfare. The BSW and the social welfare major prepare students for further academic study or for employment in selected human service arenas. The BSW prepares students as beginning-level professional social workers. The social welfare major offers an overview of current social problems.

Advising

Students interested in either the Social Welfare major or Bachelor of Social Work meet with the Social Work advisors to discuss degree requirements; career opportunities; complete the major declaration; and confer on student issues and concerns. Advisors are an excellent resource for information about campus and community services.  Students should see an advisor at least once each semester to review academic progress.  Advising appointments are made through the school's website or by calling 263-3660. Social work faculty members are available for advice about course work, research, and the social work profession in general.

Students enter the School of Social Work for either Social Welfare or Social Work begin by declaring the social welfare major. Later, if a student applies to and is accepted into the Bachelor of Social Work program (see admissions requirements below) the major is changed to Social Work.

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science—Major in Social Welfare

The social welfare major is a total of 32 credits; 20 of these are in the School of Social Work. No substitute may be made in the requirements without recommendation of the advisor and subsequent approval by the L&S deans.

Major Declaration

Students begin their program of study by taking Soc Work 205 and Soc Work 206. Students declare the social welfare major typically in the sophomore year when they are enrolled in or have taken Soc Work 205 and/or Soc Work 206. Students can declare the Social Welfare major as early as their sophomore year as long as they are enrolled in Soc Work 205 and/or Soc Work 206 and meet the L&S requirement of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.

I. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND SERVICES

A. Soc Work 205 Introduction to the Field of Social Work, 4 cr (E) (sophomore year)
B. Soc Work 206 Introduction to Social Policy, 4 cr (E) (sophomore year)

II. SOCIAL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION
(Focus on individuals, families, small groups, communities, organizations, social institutions)

Two intermediate- or advanced-level courses (6–8 cr total; [I, A, or D]) are required from one of the following social science departments:

Afro-American studies; American Indian studies; anthropology; Asian American studies; Chican@ and Latin@ studies; economics; gender and women's studies; political science; psychology; or sociology. (An elementary-level course may be a prerequisite.) Courses must be selected from the approved list. (See Social Science Concentration Courses Approved for Social Welfare Majors and BSW students, see list below.)

 III. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

A. Soc Work 640 Social Work with Ethnic and Racial Groups*, 3 cr (A) (junior year, fall semester)
B. Soc Work 457 Human Behavior and the Environment, 3 cr (I) (junior year, spring semester)

*Meets L&S ethnic studies requirement

IV. ELECTIVES IN SOCIAL WELFARE*

Two I or A electives in the School of Social Work, 6–8 cr
*No more than 3 credits of Soc Work 699 Directed Study may be used toward fulfillment of this requirement.

V. STATISTICS AND RESEARCH
A. Statistics*

Select one course from the following:
Stat 301 Introduction to Statistical Analysis,* 3 cr (I)
Stat 371 Introductory Applied Statistics for the Life Sciences,** 3 cr (r-N-I)
Soc 360 Statistics for Sociologists, 3 cr (I)
Psych 210 Psychometric Methods, 3 cr (E)

*Stat 301 is recommended by the School of Social Work. This course also fulfills 3 credits of quantitative reasoning B(r), math and natural science (N) toward the Letters and Science breadth requirements.
**Stat 371 fulfills 3 credits quantitative reasoning B(r) and natural science (N) toward L&S breadth requirements.

B. Research

Select one course from the following:
SocWork 650 Methods of Social Work Research, 3 cr (A)
Soc 357 Methods of Sociological Inquiry, 3 cr (I)
Psych 225 Experimental Psychology, 5 cr (I)

Social welfare majors are encouraged to gain social service experience through volunteer work. See the social work advisors or contact the Morgridge Center for Public Service, 263-2432, for information on volunteering.

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

The BSW is a total of 46 credits; 37 of these are in the School of Social Work.

Because the School of Social Work is a professional school within the College of Letters & Science (L&S), and the college confers the BSW degree, students also complete: UW–Madison general education requirements (including Communication Parts A & B and Quantitative Reasoning Parts A & B; either the L&S B.A. track breadth requirements or the L&S B.S. track breadth requirements; and L&S Depth and minimum GPA requirements (unless Social Work GPA requirements are higher) for their degree. No substitute may be made in the requirements without recommendation of the advisor and subsequent approval by the L&S deans.

Students begin their program of study by taking Soc Work 205 and Soc Work 206 in fall and spring semesters, respectively (generally in the sophomore year). Typically in the sophomore year when they are enrolled in or have taken Soc Work 205 and/or Soc Work 206, students declare the social welfare major. In the spring of the junior year, students apply for admission to the BSW program for their senior year.

I. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND SERVICES

A. Soc Work 205 Introduction to the Field of Social Work, 4 cr (E) (sophomore year)

B. Soc Work 206 Introduction to Social Policy, 4 cr (E) (sophomore year)

II. SOCIAL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION
(Focus on individuals, families, small groups, communities, organizations, social institutions)

Two intermediate- or advanced-level courses (6–8 cr total; [I, A, or D]) are required from one of the following social science departments:

Afro-American studies; American Indian studies, anthropology; Asian Americans studies; Chican@ and Latin@ studies; economics; gender and women's studies, political science; psychology; or sociology. (An elementary-level course may be a prerequisite.) Courses must be selected from the approved list. (See Social Science Concentration Courses Approved for Social Welfare Majors and BSW students, see list below.)

III. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

A. Soc Work 457 Human Behavior and the Environment, 3 (I) (junior year, spring semester)
B. Soc Work 640 Social Work with Ethnic and Racial Groups*, 3 (A) (junior year, fall semester)

*Meets L&S ethnic studies requirement

IV. ELECTIVE IN SOCIAL WORK

Take one I or A elective course in the School of Social Work, 3–4 cr

V. STATISTICS AND RESEARCH
A. Statistics*

Select one course from the following list:
Stat 301 Introduction to Statistical Analysis,* 3 cr (r-N-I)
Stat 371 Introductory Applied Statistics for the Life Sciences,** 3 cr (r-N-I)
Soc 360 Statistics for Sociologists, 3 cr (r-I))
Psych 210 Basic Statistics for Psychology (Psychometric Methods), 3 cr (r-E)

*Stat 301 is recommended by the School of Social Work. This course also fulfills 3 credits of quantitative reasoning B(r), math and natural science (N) toward the Letters and Science breadth requirements.
**Stat 371 fulfills 3 credits quantitative reasoning B(r) and natural science (N) toward L&S breadth requirements.

B. Research*

Select one course from the following:
Soc Work 650 Methods of Social Work Research, 3 cr (A)
Soc 357 Methods of Sociological Inquiry, 3 cr (I)
Psych 225 Experimental Psychology, 5 cr (I)

* Soc Work 650 is recommended for BSW students.  Double majors in Sociology or Psychology may take Soc 357 or Psych 225 for this requirement.

Admission to the BSW Program

In the spring of the junior year, students who meet the following eligibility criteria apply for admission to the BSW program:

  • Soc Work 205 and 206 completed;
  • Statistics completed (or concurrent enrollment);
  • Second-semester junior status (minimum of 71 credits completed); and
  • Minimum of 2.5 overall GPA from all colleges attended.

Admission to the bachelor of social work (BSW) program is based on assessment of the applicant's background, preparation and experience for practice in the field of social work. Approximately 30–35 students are admitted to the bachelor of social work program each year. Application for admission includes:

  • A personal statement on reasons for undergraduate studies in social work including any life experiences that have led the student to pursue a social work degree;
  • A summary describing social work or social work-related paid or volunteer experiences, research or community projects, multicultural experiences, and/or work abroad;
  • A letter of recommendation; and
  • An official transcript (s) from each college attended.

After acceptance, the student completes the Social Work Practice course sequence (fall and spring semesters).

VII. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE
Senior Year, Fall Semester

A. Soc Work 400 Field Practice and Integrative Seminar I, 5 cr (A)
B. Soc Work 440 Social Work Practice I: Foundations of Generalist Practice, 2 cr (A)
C. Soc Work 441 Social Work Practice II: Generalist Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups, 3 cr (I)

Senior Year, Spring Semester

A. Soc Work 401 Field Practice and Integrative Seminar II, 5 cr (A)
B. Soc Work 442 Social Work Practice III: Generalist Practice with Communities and Organizations, 2 cr (A)

BSW students are expected to maintain a cumulative 3.0 in the major and a minimum grade of BC in 400 and 401.

Field Education for BSW Students

BSW students take two semesters (16 hours per week—256 hours/semester) of field education during their senior year (Soc Work 400 fall semester, Soc Work 401 spring semester).  Soc Work 440, Soc Work 441 and Soc Work 442 are taken concurrently with Field.

A Field Forum is held in spring semester where students learn more about the field program, field units and expectations and opportunities for field placement.  The Forum provides students with the opportunity to meet the instructors who teach the field units. Following the Field Forum students indicate their field unit preferences. The director of field education makes final unit placement decisions and field instructors make final agency-placement decisions.

The types of agencies working with the field education program are varied.  Field units are organized around a social problem area or a field of practice. Each unit has a range of field placement agencies and settings appropriate to its theme. The emphasis for undergraduate placements is on applying the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with systems of all sizes. The focus is on learning and applying analytic and interventive skills within an ethically based, problem-focused approach.

Social work students should be advised that the Wisconsin Caregiver Law requires a Wisconsin background check (Caregiver Check and Wisconsin Criminal History) for all potential field education students prior to the field placement. More information regarding this process is available at Field Education on the Social Work website.

Undergraduate Social Work Field Units

Social Work Practice in Community Agencies

This unit provides opportunities to work with human service agencies and community programs. The practice perspective is generalist social work in direct and indirect services to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The primary purpose of the field placement and seminar is to provide generalist practice opportunities for the development, integration and application of key competencies that are met through measureable practice behaviors. Theory and concepts learned in the classroom are integrated with practice opportunities, fostering the implementation of evidenced-informed practice. PBridge Lake Point Waunona, Goodman, Vera Court neighborhood centers; Center for Families; Dane County Court Appointed Special Advocates [CASA]; Disability Rights-Wisconsin; Second Harvest Food Bank; UW Medical Foundation; Youth Services of Southern Wisconsin (Briarpatch); YWCA (Girls Inc., House-ability, Third Street programs), Community Care Resources, Center for Families.

Social Work Practice in Community Mental Health Agencies

This unit has been developed for generalist practice year students (BSW and first year MSW students) wanting to learn generalist social work practice in settings providing services to people with serious and persistent mental illness who are eighteen years of age and older. The placement settings include private non-profit mental health agencies, primarily providing comprehensive community support services. PMost of the placements occur in programs of the Journey Mental Health Center’s Community Support Programs (CSP’s) including: Blacksmith House, Cornerstone, Gateway, Community Treatment Alternatives, Yahara House (day services program) and the Emergency Services Unit. Additional placements occur at: SOAR Case Management Services, Chrysalis, Badger Prairie Health Care Center, Tellurian UCAN’s Transitional Housing Program, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, and Mendota Mental Health Institute’s PACT (Program of Assertive Community Treatment), an outpatient program.

Social Work Practice in County Human Services (Dane Co. or Rural Settings)

This is a county (public) human/social service agency unit with practice including both direct and indirect services with clients, participants and communities. Students are involved in child welfare, child protective services, juvenile delinquency, foster care, institutional reintegration and community social work. Field placement activities include individual and family counseling, child and family assessment, case management, juvenile court services, foster care services, institutional reintegration, group work, neighborhood and community services and overall program planning. Students in this unit may have field placement settings in voluntary community agencies that work collaboratively with the county human services department. Students gain a solid understanding of the place of a county human service agency in the human services/child and family welfare system. Placements provide opportunities to learn, develop and demonstrate competencies through practice behaviors in all or most of the required social work competency areas. Field placements available through this unit are primarily located in Dane and surrounding counties. Depending on resource needs, this unit may include Title IV-E students. sion of Children, Youth and Families, Dane County Human Services, in the following specializations: Access and Initial assessment, Ongoing Services, Child Protective Services, Foster Care, Independent Living, Juvenile Delinquency, Institutional Reintegration, Neighborhood Intervention Program, and Joining Forces for Families (community social work). Placements may also be arranged in voluntary community agencies that have collaborative relationships with county human services.

Social Work Practice in Developmental and Other Disabilities

This unit  has been developed for generalist practice year students who are interested in doing advocacy and promoting inclusive communities, especially with persons differing abilities. Since the objectives of the 400-level foundation year are primarily to teach and provide experiences in generalist social work practice, you will learn skills and knowledge applicable to a wide variety of social work settings. There is also the opportunity to work with two Madison based programs doing international projects. Through work with individuals, families, groups, and communities there will be a focus on issues related to human rights, access to services, communication challenges, and community acceptance and inclusion. The integrative seminar will utilize group work, faculty, student, and guest presentations, multimedia and experiential activities. Placement agencies include: Family Support and Resource Center, Waisman Center, Options in Community Living, Bridges Birth to Three programs.

Social Work Practice in Juvenile and Criminal Justice

The focus of this unit is direct social work practice in juvenile and adult criminal justice community and institutional settings. The unit focuses on helping students conceptualize client typologies related to social responses and interventions including: pre-sentence decisions, probation and parole supervision, institutional interventions, group homes, juvenile community treatment, policy and planning administration. Interventions related to conceptualization of client subtypes, demography of crime and delinquency and violent crime are some of the major content areas for study. RC Correctional Services for Women, Attic Correctional Services, Dane County Deferred Prosecution, Dane County Family Violence Unit, Dane County Juvenile Detention and Court Services, Dane County Victim/Witness Unit, Domestic Violence Intervention Services, Operation Fresh Start, VA Hospital, Youth Services of Southern Wisconsin, Madison YWCA, Juvenile Group Homes for male and female delinquent youth, Mendota Mental Health Institute, Sand Ridge Secure Treatment Facility, U.S. Probation Office, Wisconsin Adult Correctional Institutions, Wisconsin Public Defender’s Office.

Social Work Practice with Older Adults

This field unit provides field placements in a variety of agency, community, health care and institutional settings that primarily serve older adults. All of the field placements deal with issues of aging, community, mental health, policy, and institutions. The primary purpose of the field placement is to provide an opportunity for guided practical experience in social work settings so that students may acquire the knowledge, values, and skills essential for professional gerontological social work practice. This field unit provides opportunities for integrating theoretical content and knowledge with the practice experience. The practice perspective of the aging and mental health unit is generalist practice, which includes a problem-focused generalist approach with a special emphasis on: (1) direct service to older adults and their families; and (2) resource development and coordination. Agrace Hospice, Alzheimers Association; Attic Angel Place; Badger Prairie Health Care Center; Care Wisconsin; Catholic Charities; Dane County Human Services Guardianship & Protective Placement; East Madison Monona Coalition of the Aging; Fitchburg Senior Center; the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) at the Veterans Administration Hospital; Jewish Social Service; North Eastside Senior Coalition; Retired Senior Volunteer Program; South Madison Coalition; St. Mary’s Adult Day Center; St. Mary’s Care Center; Oak Park Retirement Community; UW Health Geriatrics Clinic.

Social Work Practice in Public and Private Child Welfare

This field unit is a public human/social service agency unit with practice including both direct and indirect services with clients. Students are involved in child welfare and child protective services, juvenile delinquency, foster care and community social work. Placement activities include child protective services initial assessment, family assessment, case planning, individual and family counseling, case management, juvenile court services, foster care services, neighborhood and community services and overall program planning. Students gain a solid understanding of the place of a public social service agency in the human services/child and child welfare system. Placements provide skills in case assessment and planning, case management, counseling, court services, group work and community resource networking.  Field Placements locations for the field unit include: County Human Service/Social Service offices in Columbia, Dane, Green, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock and Sauk Counties and include the following specializations: Foster Care, Child Welfare, Child Protective Services, Access, Initial Assessments, and Ongoing Services.

For more information about field units, the agencies they work with, and field course expectations see the Field Education Handbook. Field unit availability may vary from year to year.

Educational Competencies and Outcomes for BSW Students

The BSW Program is designed to prepare students with the requisite knowledge, values and skills for generalist social work practice.  Competent generalist practitioners are social workers who:

  • Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly
  • Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice
  • Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgements
  • Engage diversity and difference in practice
  • Advance human rights and social and economic justice
  • Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment
  • Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services
  • Respond to contexts that shape practice
  • Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities
  • Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities
  • Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities, and
  • Evaluate intervention

Social Science Concentration Courses Approved for Social Welfare Majors and BSW Students (take two courses from the same department)

Afro-American Studies

302 Topics in Afro-American Studies (when topic is appropriate)
323 Gender, Race and Class: Women in U.S. History (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
330 African/Afro-American Historical Relationships: 1700 to the Present
333 Black Feminisms (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
347 The Caribbean and its Diasporas 
443 Mutual Perceptions of Racial Minorities
523 Race, American Medicine and Public Health
567 History of the African American Education
635 Afro-American History to 1900 (crosslisted with Soc)
636 Afro-American History since 1900 (crosslisted with History)
671 Topics in Afro-American History (when topic is appropriate)
673 Selected Topics in Afro-American Society (when topic is appropriate)

American Indian Studies

314 Indians of North America (crosslisted with Anthro)
353 Indians of the Western Great Lakes (crosslisted with Anthro)
444 Native American Environmental Issues and the Media (crosslisted with LifeSciComm)
450 Topics in American Indian Studies (when topic is appropriate)
490 American Indian History (crosslisted with History)
522 American Indian Families (crosslisted with HDFS)
578 Poverty and Place (crosslisted with Soc)

Anthropology

314 Indians of North America (crosslisted with Amer Ind)
321 The Emergence of Human Culture
330 Topics in Ethnology (when topic is appropriate)
343 Anthropology of Religion (crosslisted with Relig St)
350 Political Anthropology
353 Indians of the Western Great Lakes (crosslisted with Amer Ind)
365 Medical Anthropology
443 Anthropology by Women (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
448 Anthropology of Law
545 Psychological Anthropology
570 Anthropology and Education  

Asian American Studies

220 Ethnic Movements in the U.S. (crosslisted with Soc)
240 Topics in Asia American Studies (when topic is appropriate)
246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the "Cold War" (crosslisted with History)
276 Chinese Migration since 1500 (crosslisted with History)
443 Mutual Perceptions of Racial Minorities (crosslisted with AfroAmer)

Chican@ and Latin@ Studies

231 Politics in Multi-Cultural Societies (crosslisted with Poli Sci)

301 Chican/a and Chican/o History

330 Topics in Chican/a Studies (when topic is appropriate)

332 Latinas: Self Identity and Social Change (crosslisted with Gen&WS)

435 Colony, Nation, and Minority: The Puerto Ricans' World (crosslisted with History

464 Mexican-American Politics (crosslisted with Poli Sci)

Economics

300 Introduction to Finance
301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

306 The Real Estate Process
311 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory—Advanced Treatment
312 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory—Advanced Treatment

343 Environmental Economics (crosslisted with AAE, Envir St)
364 Survey of International Economics
390 Contemporary Economic Issues (when topic is appropriate)
420 Urban and Regional Economics (crosslisted with Urb R Pl)

441 Analytical Public Finance
448 Human Resources and Economic Growth

449 Government and Natural Resources (crosslisted with Poli Sci)
450 Wages and the Labor Market
467 International Industrial Organizations
474 Economic Problems of Developing Areas (crosslisted with AAE, Econ)
475 Economics of Growth

508 Wealth and Income

521 Game Theory and Economic Analysis
522 Law and Economics
524 Philosophy and Economics

531 Natural Resource Economics
548 The Economics of Health Care

623 Population Economics

641 Housing Economics and Policy (crosslisted with Urb R Pl, Bus)
663 Population and Society (crosslisted with Soc)

Gender and Women's Studies

200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (crosslisted with Soc)
215 Gender and Work in Rural America (crosslisted with Soc)
245 Chicana and Latina History (crosslisted with Chicla, History)
320 Special Topics in Women and Society (when topic is appropriate)
323 Gender, Race and Class: Women in U.S. History (crosslisted with AfroAmer)
331 Topics in Gender/Class/Race/Ethnicity (when topic is appropriate)
332 Latinas: Self Identity and Social Change (crosslisted with Chicla)
333 Black Feminisms (crosslisted with Afroamer)
340 Topics in LGBTQ Sexuality (when topic is appropriate)
342 Transgender Studies
353 Women and Gender in the U.S. to 1870 (crosslisted with History)
354 Women and Gender in the U.S. since 1870 (crosslisted with History)
392 Women in History
420 Women in Cross-Societal Perspective
421 Constructions of Gender in the Media
424 Women's International Human Rights
426 Women and Grassroots Politics Across the Globe
427 Global Feminisms
431 Childbirth in the United States (Hist Sci, Med Hist)
441 Contemporary Feminist Theories
443 Anthropology by Women (crosslisted with Anthro)
477 Feminism and Sociological Theory (crosslisted with Soc)
519 Sexuality, Modernity and Social Change (crosslisted with History)
522 Psychology of Women (crosslisted with Psych)
534 Gender, Sexuality, and Reproduction: Public Health Perspectives
535 Women's Global Health and Human Rights (crosslisted with Intl St)
547 Theorizing Intersectionality
601 Sociology of Work, Family, and Gender
611 Gender, Science and Technology
643 Women and Politics in a Global Context
664 Women in the Global Economy

Political Science

201 Special Topics in Political Science (when topic is appropriate)
205 Introduction to State Government
217 Law, Politics and Society
219 Introduction to Public Policy
231 Politics in Multi-Cultural Societies (crosslisted with Chicla)
267 Introduction to Political Psychology
312 Politics of the World Economy
316 Principles of International Law
317 The Politics of Human Rights
318 The Comparative Study of Genocide
353 The Third World in the International System
371 International Political Economy
376 Analysis of International Relations
378 Conflict Resolution
405 State Government and Public Policy
408 The American Presidency
411–412 Constitutional Law I and II
417 The American Judicial System
422 Latino History and Politics (crosslisted with History)
424 American Parties and Politics
425 Citizenship, Democracy & Difference
426 United States Congress
428 Community Power and Grass Roots Politics
443 Public Administration
446 Politics of Government Regulation
449 Government and Natural Resources (crosslisted with  Econ, Envir St, Urb R Pl)
452 Criminal Law and Justice
462 Political Economy of Race in the U.S.
464 Mexican-American Politics (crosslisted with Chicla)
467 Elections and Voting Behavior
470 The First Amendment
471 Civil Liberties in the United States
472 Interest Group Politics 
473 Public Opinion
479 Political Communications
513 Radical Political Theory
617 Comparative Legal Institutions
643 Women and Politics in a Global Context (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
654 Politics of Revolution
657 Comparative Political Culture
664 Women in the Global Economy (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
667 Contentious Politics

Psychology

267 Introduction to Political Psychology
311 Issues in Psychology (when the topic is appropriate)
350 Human Sexuality (crosslisted with Soc)
390 Psychology and Economics (when topic is appropriate)
402 Literacy, Brain and Behavior
408 Psychology of Human Emotions
413 Language, Mind and Brain
414 Cognitive Psychology
430 History of Psychology
483 Honors-Language, Mind, and Brain
488 Honors Psychology of Human Emotions
501 Topics in Psychology (when topic is appropriate)
502 Cognitive Development
503 Social Development
507 Psychology of Personality
508 Psychology of Human Emotions: From Biology to Culture
509 Abnormal Psychology
511 Behavior Pathology: Neurosis
512 Behavior Pathology: Psychosis
522 Psychology of Women (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
526 The Criminal Mind: Forensic and Psychobiological Perspectives
528 Introduction to Cultural Psychology
530 Introductory Social Psychology (crosslisted with Soc)
560 Child Psychology
564 Adult Development and Aging
581 Honors Topics in Psychology (when topic is appropriate)
582 Honors Cognitive Development
583 Honors Social Development
585 Honors in Social Psychology
586 Honors Seminar: The Criminal Mind: Forensic and Psychobiological Perceptions
587 Honors Course-Psychology of Personality
588 Introduction to Cultural Psychology-Honors
589 Honors Seminar in Abnormal Psychology

Sociology

181 Honors Introductory Seminar-The Sociological Enterprise
200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
210 Survey of Sociology
211 The Sociological Enterprise
215 Gender and Work in Rural America
220 Ethnic Movements in the U.S.
250 Organizations and Society
350 Human Sexuality (crosslisted with Psych)
380 Contemporary Population Problems for Honors (crosslisted with Pop Health, C&E Soc)
421 Processes of Deviant Behavior
441 Criminology
446 Juvenile Delinquency
475 Classical Sociological Theory
477 Feminism and Sociological Theory (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
496 Topics in Sociology (when topic is appropriate)
530 Introductory Social Psychology (crosslisted with Psych)
531 Sociology of Medicine
532 Health Care Issues for Individuals, Families and Society
533 Public Health in Rural and Urban Communities
535 Talk and Social Interaction
540 Sociology of International Development, Environment, and Sustainability (crosslisted with C&E Soc, Envir St)
541 Environmental Stewardship and Social Justice (crosslisted with C&E Soc)
543 Collective Behavior
573 Community Organization and Change
575 Sociological Perspectives on the Life Course and Aging
578 Poverty and Place (Amer Ind, C&E Soc)
601 Sociology of Work, Family and Gender (crosslisted with Gen&WS)
610 Knowledge and Society
611 Gender, Science and Technology
617 Community Development (crosslisted with C&E Soc, Urb R Pl)
621 Class, State, and Ideology: an Introduction to Marxist Social Science
622 Advanced Topics in Critical Sociology (when topic is appropriate)
623 Gender, Society and Politics
630 Sociology of Developing Societies/Third World
632 Sociology of Organizations
633 Social Stratification
640 Sociology of the Family
641 Sociology of Law (crosslisted with Law, Legal St) 
645 Modern American Communities (crosslisted with Urb R Pl)
648 Sociology of Education (crosslisted with Ed Pol)
650 Sociology of Agriculture
652 Sociology of Economic Institutions
655 Microfoundations of Economic Sociology
652 Sociology of Economic Institutions
663 Population and Society
670 Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy in America Since 1890 (crosslisted with History)
678 Sociology of Persecution

Honors in the Major

Honors in the Major for social welfare majors and bachelor of social work students prepare undergraduates for research and scholarship in social work. Students interested in completing the requirements for Honors in the Major should consult with and apply for admission to the program with the social work academic advisor. Majors declare their intention to enter the program no later than the end of the spring semester of the junior year. Students must make arrangements with a faculty member to sponsor their research project before being admitted to the honors program.

Requirements for Honors in the Major include the following: (1) a signed agreement between the student and the faculty research advisor sponsoring the Senior Honors Research Thesis; (2) completion of the majors' statistics requirement; (3) completion of Soc Work 650 Social Work Research Methods; (4) completion of one social work elective related to honors thesis research topic; (5) completion of the Senior Honors Research Thesis (Soc Work 681 and Soc Work 682); (6) completion of Soc Work 579 Special Topics: Faculty Research Seminar in the fall semester of the senior year; and (7) presentation of the thesis results at a department colloquium.

Honors in the Major students are expected to maintain at least a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.4 and complete the regular major requirements and an overall GPA of at least 3.3 in all courses taken at UW–Madison. Students are encouraged to apply to the Honors in the Major as early as possible, but no later than the spring semester of their junior year.

Honors in the Major Procedures
  • Meet with an academic advisor to discuss Honors in the Major requirements.
  • Determine faculty research advisor (no later than end of the spring semester of junior year). The faculty research advisor for the senior honors thesis should be consulted about the project as early as possible to formulate a topic.
  • Declare entry into Honors in the Major (no later than the end of the spring semester of junior year).
  • Submit signed Faculty Advisor Agreement form to the academic advisor.
HONORS IN THE MAJOR COURSE REQUIREMENTS
By the end of the Junior Year complete:

Statistics (Stat 301 or 371, Soc 360, Psych 210, or Psych 280)
Soc Work 650 Research Methods
Soc Work Elective (related to thesis topic)

Fall Semester of Senior Year

Soc Work 579 Special Topics: Faculty Research Seminar
Soc Work 681 Honors Research Thesis

Spring Semester of Senior Year

Soc Work 682 Honors Research Thesis
Thesis Presentation

Independent Work

Students with an interest in a particular area of study may develop a plan of independent work with the assistance of an interested faculty member. They may obtain information about instructors and their areas of interest from the School of Social Work website. Consent of instructor is required for the following course offerings in independent work: Senior Honors Thesis (681–682, year-long course); Senior Thesis (691–692, year-long course); Directed Study (699).

15 Credit Rule

All students are required to fulfill the L&S requirement of 15 credits of upper-level work in the major taken in residence. Courses that count toward this requirement for Social Work and Social Welfare are: Soc Work 650, Soc 357 or Psych 225; Soc Work 457; 640; Soc Work 440; Soc Work 441; Soc Work 442; and those social work electives designated as I or A.

Certificate Programs

BSW students and social welfare majors often choose the following certificate programs: American Indian studies, business, criminal justice, gender and women's studies, gerontology, global cultures, global health, LGBT studies, and religious studies. For more details follow the specific Certificate Program links found in the Undergraduate Catalog page on Undergraduate Majors and Certificate Programs.

Accreditation

The BSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The social welfare major is accredited along with the rest of the College of Letters and Science by the Higher Learning Commission.

Graduate School

BSW students completing professional foundation courses with a grade of B or better are eligible for advanced standing in the master's program. For more information see the School of Social Work website FAQs on "Admissions: Advanced Standing & Exemptions."