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College of Letters & Science

Asian Studies

Concentration in East Asian Studies
   Major with East Asian Concentration
   Requirements for the Major
   Honors in the Major
   Certificate in East Asian Studies
   Requirements for the Certificate
   Courses—East Asian Area Studies

Concentration in Southeast Asian Studies
   Declaring the Major
   Required Course Work
   Core Introductory Courses for the Concentration in Southeast Asian Studies
   Honors in the Major
   Thesis of Distinction

Asian Studies is divided into two concentrations: East Asian Studies and Southeast Asian Studies. Students interested in more specialized study of the languages and literature of East Asia should see East Asian Languages and Literature; those interested in more specialized study of languages and culture of other areas of Asia should see Languages and Cultures of Asia, REECAS (Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies), and South Asian Studies.

Concentration in East Asian Studies

333 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706; 608-262-3643; eas@intl-institute.wisc.edu; eastasia.wisc.edu

China Core Faculty: Professors Curtin, Dong, Eichenseher, Friedman, Irish, Manion, Murray, Nienhauser, Pan; Associate Professors Huntington, Huang, Merli, Sheehan, Zhang, Zhou; Assistant Professor Meulenbeld, Yang

Japan Core Faculty: Professors Davis, McGloin, Mori, Ohnuki-Tierney, Phillips, Young; Associate Professors D'Etcheverry, Furumoto, Geyer,  Kern, Leheny, Mori, Raymo, Thal; Assistant Professor  Ridgeley

Korea Core Faculty: Professor Sutton; Assistant Professors Kim, Ohnesorge

Undergraduate advisors: Dreux Montgomery (student programs coordinator), David Dettmann (assistant director), Richard Miller (associate director)

East Asian studies encompasses China, Japan, and Korea—Pacific Rim nations characterized by rich cultural heritages, critical geopolitical positions and rapidly expanding economies. East Asia plays a central role in world politics and the global economy, and the importance of this region will increase in the 21st century. The Center for East Asian Studies acts as a clearinghouse and coordinating center bringing together an interdisciplinary group of faculty, staff, and students interested in the study of China, Japan, Korea, and, in association with South Asian Studies, Tibet. Courses related to East Asia are taught by core and affiliated faculty across the university.

The Center for East Asian Studies administers two options for undergraduates within the East Asian studies concentration: an undergraduate major and an undergraduate certificate. Each semester, the center posts a list of courses offered throughout the university related to East Asia that may count toward the major and certificate. Students should consult the undergraduate advisor for guidance on whether a particular course counts toward the major. Prospective majors are urged to consult the EAS undergraduate advisor at the first possible opportunity, and majors planning to graduate should see the advisor at least one semester before the semester in which they plan to graduate to ensure that they fulfill the requirements for the major in a timely manner.

Major with East Asian Concentration

The official name of the major is Asian Studies: East Asian Concentration. This major is for undergraduates who are interested in a wide range of careers (business, law, public service, research, teaching, etc.) and who seek a focused yet multidisciplinary education to provide a solid grounding not only in East Asian language but also in the humanities and social sciences beyond languages and literature. Students who choose this major are strongly encouraged to participate in study abroad programs in East Asia administered by the University of Wisconsin or other institutions.

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 30 credits in courses related to East Asia selected according to the guidelines below is required for the major. To assure familiarity with language, general breadth of knowledge about East Asia, and rigor in a single discipline, the following are required:

Language: At least two years of an East Asian language—Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan. East Asian studies majors are required to take at least two semesters of work beyond first-year or elementary-level courses. The first- and second-semester courses in one of these languages do not count toward the 30-credit minimum for the major, but additional East Asian language credits do count.

Humanities: At least 8 credits are required in East Asian civilization and the humanities (not including language credits): art history, communication arts, history, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, religious studies, theatre, etc.

Social Science: At least 8 credits are required in East Asian social sciences: anthropology, business, economics, geography, history, law, political science, sociology, etc.

Concentration: At least 8 credits (not including language credits) must be concentrated in a single discipline (for example, in history, or in political science, or in art history, etc.). Courses counted toward humanities, social science and upper-level course requirements may also count toward the concentration.

Upper-Level Courses: All students are required to fulfill the L&S requirement of at least 15 credits of upper-level work in the major completed in residence. Courses numbered 300 or above count toward this requirement, as long as they are eligible to count toward the 30 credits required for the major. Courses counted toward the other requirements for the major may be counted toward the upper-level course requirement.

Senior Thesis: Recommended, but not required for the major. By the end of the junior year, a student choosing to do a two-semester senior thesis should have a faculty member agree in writing to supervise the thesis work. Students writing a senior thesis enroll for two semesters of credit (EAS 691–692), under the supervision of their chosen faculty advisor. Please consult with the EAS undergraduate advisor for more details.

Honors in the Major

Students who wish to graduate with Honors in the Major may do so by fulfilling the following requirements:

  • Receive permission from the EAS advisor to enroll as an honors major, no later than the beginning of the junior year. To be eligible, the student must have an overall GPA of at least 3.5.
  • Obtain the consent of a member of the EAS core or affiliated faculty to serve as advisor for the honors thesis. In general, the student should take a course with this faculty member before asking him or her to become the student's advisor.
  • Take at least 3 to 6 additional course credits at the intermediate to advanced level, selected in consultation with the EAS advisor, as preparation for senior thesis research.
  • Write an honors thesis, for two semesters of credit (EAS 681–682), under the supervision of the faculty advisor.
  • Achieve a GPA of at least 3.5 in EAS courses and an overall GPA of at least 3.3 in all courses taken at UW–Madison at the time of graduation.

Students should check with the undergraduate advisor in East Asian studies at least once a year to make sure that requirements have not been modified, as well as to seek guidance about planning the best possible Honors in the Major curriculum that reflects their special interests.

Certificate in East Asian Studies

The undergraduate certificate in East Asian studies is available to students working toward a baccalaureate degree in any of the University of Wisconsin–Madison schools and colleges, and to Special students. This certificate meets the needs of students choosing to focus on the East Asian region (China, Korea, Japan, and Tibet) within their primary major, but not wishing to commit to the rigorous language study required for the East Asian studies major. Students select course work reflecting their interests from myriad classes offered through many university departments, and can work toward a variety of undergraduate majors. Upon earning the certificate, this emphasis is noted on the student's transcript. The certificate is of value to students wishing to demonstrate their knowledge of the East Asian region either to potential employers or to graduate schools.

Requirements for the Certificate

A minimum of 21 credits in courses related to East Asia, selected according to the following guidelines, is required for the certificate.

To ensure a well-rounded knowledge of East Asia, students must complete:

  • A minimum of 21 credits, consisting of at least six courses, selected from at least three departments.
  • East Asian Studies 222, unless specific exception (per approval of the center director) is given.
  • At least three courses numbered 300 or above.
  • A maximum of 3 credits of 699 or 698 (Directed Study) can be counted toward the 21 total credits.
  • A maximum of 12 language credits may be counted toward the 21 total credits.

Study of an East Asian language is strongly encouraged, but not required. Courses in elementary Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Tibetan are available, providing an introduction to the fundamentals of the languages, without necessarily requiring additional advanced language course work.


Concentration in Southeast Asian Studies

207 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706-1397; 608-263-1755; seasia@intl-institute.wisc.edu; seasia.wisc.edu.

Professors Bickner, Bowie (director), Cowell, Coxhead, George, Gunther, Macken, A. McCoy, Olds, Rafferty, Sidel, Sutton, Winichakul, Zhou; Associate Professors Gade, Hansen; Assistant Professors Baird, Choy, Kamata, Kim, Nobles; Faculty Associates Bernard, Cullinane, M. McCoy

Undergraduate advisor: Michael Cullinane, 207 Ingraham Hall, 608-263-1755, mmcullin@wisc.edu

The Southeast Asian Studies Concentration is administered by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, in cooperation with faculty who teach and do research on Southeast Asia. Southeast Asia is one of the world's most diverse and rapidly developing regions. It includes Burma (Myanmar), Brunei, Cambodia (Kampuchea), East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. The Southeast Asia concentration permits students with a wide range of career goals (among them academic, business, law, public service, teaching, journalism) to focus their multidisciplinary study on this dynamic region. The program is based on a solid grounding in language and content courses. Juniors and seniors are encouraged to participate in study-abroad programs in Southeast Asia (in particular Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam).

Declaring the Major

The major should be declared no later than the beginning of the junior year. Students with no previous language training or proficiency should consider beginning language study during their sophomore year, since language course sequences begin only once per year during the fall semester. Students interested in Southeast Asia are encouraged to consult with center administrators (Michael Cullinane, associate director and advisor; Mary Jo Wilson, assistant to the director, mjstuden@wisc.edu) at any time from the freshman year onward to discuss the program.

Required Course Work

Southeast Asia content courses: Concentrators are required to take 30 credits of content courses on Southeast Asia. These courses must include:

  1. an 8-credit concentration in a single discipline;
  2. at least 8 credits in humanities (language beyond first year, literature, music, dance, religious studies, theatre, history);
  3. at least 8 credits in social sciences (economics, anthropology, political science, sociology, education, business, law, history).

Students should consult with center administrators to discuss concentrations and course selection at the beginning of each semester.

Language study: Concentrators are required to take at least four semesters of a Southeast Asian language, but only the 400-level or above courses will count toward the 30-credit minimum for the major. Instruction is available at four levels in Hmong, Indonesian, Thai, and Vietnamese, and at two levels in Filipino (Tagalog). Intensive summer instruction is available through the Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI), hosted by the center (with instruction in the five academic year languages, plus Burmese, Javanese, Khmer, and Lao), and advanced training abroad is available in Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, and Vietnam. Concentrators are encouraged to pursue language study into the third- and fourth-year levels.

All students are required to fulfill the L&S requirement of at least 15 credits of upper-level work in the major completed in residence. Courses numbered 300 or above count toward this requirement.

Core Introductory Courses for the Concentration in Southeast Asian Studies

Please check with each of the department offices for information on specific courses and frequency of department offerings. For graduate courses and programs, see the Graduate School Catalog.

Agricultural and Applied Economics

473 Economic Growth and Development in Southeast Asia, 3 cr (also Econ)

Anthropology

310 Archaeology of East and Southeast Asia, 3 cr

330 Topics in Ethnology: Peoples and Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia, 3 cr
330 Topics in Ethnology: Art in Island Southeast Asia, 3 cr

Asian American Studies

160 Asian American History: Movement and Dislocation, 3 cr (also Hist)
161 Asian American History: Settlement and National Belonging, 3 cr (also Hist)
246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the Cold War, 4 cr (also Hist, LCA)

Business

615 Business in Emerging Markets, 3 cr

Communication Arts

470 Contemporary Political Discourse, 3 cr
610 Topics: Freedom of Speech in Global Perspective, 3 cr

Dance

353 Javanese Dance Performance, 2 cr
453 Javanese Performance Repertory, 2 cr

Geography

244 Introduction to Southeast Asia, 4 cr (also Hist, LCA, Poli Sci, Soc)
305 Introduction to the City, 3 cr
675 Political Ecology of Southeast Asia, 3 cr

History

160 Asian American History: Movement and Dislocation, 3 cr (also Asian Am)
161 Asian American History: Settlement and National Belonging, 3 cr (also Asian Am)
244 Introduction to Southeast Asia, 4 cr (also Geog, LCA, Poli Sci, and Soc)
246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the Cold War, 4cr (also LCA, Asian Am)
319 The Vietnam Wars, 4 cr (also LCA)
438 Buddhism and Society in Southeast Asian History, 4 cr (also LCA)
457 Southeast Asia to 1800, 4 cr (also LCA)
458 Southeast Asia since 1800, 4 cr (also LCA)
600 Undergraduate Seminars on Southeast Asia, 3 r

International Studies

373 Globalization, Development, and Poverty, 3 cr

Languages and Cultures of Asia (LCA)

100 Introduction to the Cultures of Asia, 3 cr
244 Introduction to Southeast Asia, 4 cr (also Hist, Geog, Poli Sci, Soc)
246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the Cold War, 4 cr (also Hist, Asian Am)
273 Religion in History and Culture: The East, 3 cr (also Relig St)
300 Topics: Religion and Society in Contemporary SE Asia (also Relig St)
300 Topics: Colonial Literature—Netherlands Indies, 3 cr
300 Topics: Religion, Colonialism and Modernity in SE Asia, 3 cr (also Relig St)
301 Modern Indonesian Literature in Translation, 3 cr
361 Survey of Indonesian Cultures, 3 cr
364 Introduction to Buddhism, 3 cr (also Relig St)

370 Islam: Religion and Culture, 3 cr (also Relig St)
379 Cities of Asia, 3 cr
401 Modern Indonesian Literature, 3 cr
403 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation: Mainland, 3 cr
404 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation: Maritime, 3 cr
438 Buddhism and Society in Southeast Asian History, 3 cr (also Hist)
441 Language and Society in Southeast Asia, 3 cr
457 Southeast Asia to 1800, 3 cr (also Hist)
458 Southeast Asia Since 1800, 3 cr (also Hist)
460 History of Buddhism and Buddhist Institutions, 3 cr (also Relig St)
616 Modern Thai Literature: The Novel, 3 cr
617 Thai Poetry, 3 cr
618 Thai Prose Literature: The Short Story, 3 cr
620 Proseminar: Religions of Asia: Theravada Buddhism, 3 cr (also Relig St)
666 Proseminar: Literatures of Asia: Ramayana, 3 cr
671 Structure of Thai, 3 cr

Literature in Translation

303 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation: Mainland, 3 cr
304 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation: Maritime, 3 cr
401 Modern Indonesian Literature in Translation, 3 cr

Music

361 Beginning Javanese Gamelan, 1 cr
402 Musical Cultures of the World: East and Southeast Asia, 3 cr
404 Music in SE Asia: Tradition, Innovation, Politics, and Religion, 3 cr

Political Science

244 Introduction to Southeast Asia, 4 cr (also Hist, Geog, LCA, Soc)
339 Southeast Asian International Relations, 4 cr
639 Politics of Southeast Asia, 4 cr

Religious Studies

273 Religion in History and Culture: The East, 3 cr (also LCA)
300 Topics: Religion and Society in Contemporary SE Asia, 3 cr (also LCA)
300 Topics: Religion, Colonialism and Modernity in SE Asia, 3 cr (also LCA)
364 Introduction to Buddhism, 3 cr (also LCA)
370 Islam: Religion and Culture, 3 cr (also LCA)
460 History of Buddhism and Buddhist Institutions, 3 cr (also LCA)
620 Prosem: Relgions of Asia: Theravada Buddhism, 3 cr (also LCA)

Sociology

244 Introduction to Southeast Asia, 4 cr (also Hist, Geog, LCA, Poli Sci)

Academic Year Language Offerings
Hmong Language

LCA Lang 307/308 First/Second Semester Hmong, 4 cr
LCA Lang 407/408 Third/Fourth Semester Hmong, 4 cr
LCA Lang 507/508 Fifth/Sixth Semester Hmong, 3 cr
First, third, and fifth semester are offered only in the fall.

Indonesian Language

LCA Lang 309/310 First/Second Semester Indonesian, 4 cr
LCA Lang 409/410 Third/Fourth Semester Indonesian, 4 cr
LCA Lang 509/510 Fifth/Sixth Semester Indonesian, 3 cr
First, third, and fifth semester are offered only in the fall.

Filipino Language

LCA Lang 305/306 First/Second Semester Filipino, 4 cr
LCA Lang 405/406 Third/Fourth Semester Filipino, 4 cr
First and third semester are offered only in the fall.

Thai Language

LCA Lang 317/318 First/Second Semester Thai, 4 cr
LCA Lang 417/418 Third/Fourth Semester Thai, 4 cr
LCA Lang 517/518 Fifth/Sixth Semester Thai, 3 cr
First, third, and fifth semester are offered only in the fall.

Vietnamese Language

LCA Lang 319/320 First/Second Semester Vietnamese, 4 cr
LCA Lang 419/420 Third/Fourth Semester Vietnamese, 4 cr
LCA Lang 519/520 Fifth/Sixth Semester Vietnamese, 3 cr
First, third, and fifth semester are offered only in the fall.

Honors in the Major

Students interested in earning Honors in the Major should consult with the department honors advisor. Students should ordinarily declare to the department their intention to graduate with Honors in the Major at the end of their sophomore year or the start of their junior year, and must receive permission from the department honors advisor before being admitted to the department honors track.

Thesis of Distinction

A student choosing to write a senior thesis must, by the end of the junior year, have a faculty member agree in writing to supervise the thesis work.