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College of Engineering

Engineering Mechanics

Objectives of the Engineering Mechanics Program
Engineering Mechanics Curriculum
Astronautics Option in Engineering Mechanics
Astronautics Curriculum
Nuclear Engineering Scholars and Distinguished Scholars Program
Honors in Undergraduate Research Program
Facilities
Courses

153 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706; 608-263-7038; www.engr.wisc.edu/ep/ema

Professors Blanchard (chair), T. Allen, Bier (also Industrial Engineering), Bisognano, Bonazza, Corradini (also Mechanical Engineering), Crone, Drugan, Fonck, Hegna, Henderson, Kammer, Lakes, Mackie (also Medical Physics), Moses, Pfotenhauer (also Mechanical Engineering), Plesha, Smith (also Mathematics), Sovinec, Vanderby (also Biomedical Engineering), Waleffe (also Mathematics), Wilson; Associate Professor M. Allen, Thomadsen (also Medical Physics), Witt; Assistant Professors Notbohm, Scarlat, Schmitz

The Department of Engineering Physics administers the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics. The B.S. degree in engineering mechanics may be accompanied by an option in astronautics.

Engineering mechanics provides a broad basic scientific background which enables its graduates to explore fundamental questions in most fields of engineering. The curriculum emphasizes the basic sciences—mathematics, computer science, physics, and chemistry, and the engineering sciences—fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, materials science, and electrical engineering. Although entitled engineering mechanics here, similar programs are offered at many other major universities under such titles as engineering science, or theoretical and applied mechanics.

The objective of the program is to provide the student with a broad background in the fundamental physical sciences and applied mathematics, coordinated with both theoretical and applied engineering methods and experimental techniques. This type of educational background will give the student the degree of versatility necessary for dealing with the variety and complexity of modern technological problems as well as the ability to adapt to the rapidly changing needs and interests of industry, government, and society.

The values of an education in engineering mechanics are many. First, engineers frequently work on interdisciplinary teams with chemists, physicists, and mathematicians and must be able to interact with them. Second, many industrial organizations prefer that their engineers have a broad, fundamental scientific background. Third, and probably most important, great changes have taken place in science and engineering during recent years. Among the most important of these have been the rapid diffusion of scientific knowledge and disciplines into engineering, the increasing use of analytical and computer methods for the solution of practical problems, the need for a better understanding of the properties and behavior of materials, and the increasing need for engineers who can adapt known methods to new situations and develop new experimental and analytical methods.

The required courses taken early in the curriculum are intended to give the student a fundamental background in mathematics, science, and engineering. In addition to developing versatility through exposure to important concepts in various scientific fields, the required courses allow the students to identify areas of interest. With the relatively large number of elective credits available in the latter part of the program, the student may either continue to follow a general program or may prefer to concentrate elective courses in such areas as stress analysis and structural mechanics, dynamics and vibrations, experimental mechanics, applied mathematics, materials science, geological engineering, biomechanics, aerospace mechanics, mechanical systems analysis, etc.

Engineering mechanics graduates are sought by most industries and governmental agencies including in particular those participating in the newly developing areas of engineering such as space technology, performance of new structural materials, and so on. Their work often involves participation in design, research and development projects where the problems are sufficiently complex or unusual that their solutions require engineers with (1) a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of engineering, (2) advanced training in the established experimental and analytical methods, and (3) the ability to develop new experimental and analytical methods to attack problems for which standard methods, formulas, and materials have not yet been developed. The program also provides excellent preparation for graduate study in a variety of related disciplines.

Entrance Requirements. See this link.

Objectives of the Engineering Mechanics Program

The objectives of the engineering mechanics program are to:

  • Educate students in the fundamental subjects necessary for a career in mechanics and/or astronautics, and prepare students for advanced education in these and related fields.
  • Educate students in the basics of instrumentation, design of laboratory techniques, measurement, and data acquisition, interpretation and analysis.
  • Educate students in the methodology of design.
  • Provide and facilitate teamwork and multidisciplinary experiences throughout the curriculum.
  • Help students develop effective oral and written communication skills.
  • Expose students to environmental, ethical and contemporary issues.

Engineering Mechanics Curriculum

The following curriculum applies to students who entered the College of Engineering after fall 2014.

Summary

Mathematics/Statistics Requirement, 22 cr
Science Requirement, 13 cr
Engineering Science Requirement, 26 cr
Engineering Mechanics Core Requirement, 31 cr
EMA Electives, 9 cr
Communications Skills Requirement, 7 cr 
Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 cr
Technical Electives Requirement, 3 cr

Total Credits: 127
I. Mathematics Requirement, 22 credits

Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 234 Calculus—Function of Several Variables, 3 cr
Math 319 Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations, 3 cr
Math 340 Elementary Matrix and Linear Algebra, 3 cr
Stat 224 Introductory Statistics for Engineers, 3 cr

II. Science Requirement, 13 credits

Chem 109 General Chemistry, 5 cr
Physics 202 General Physics, 5 cr
Physics 241 or 205 Modern Physics, 3 cr

III. Engineering Science Requirement, 26 credits

EPD 160 Introduction to Engineering, 3 cr
ME 231 Introductory Engineering Graphics, 2 cr
EP 271 Engineering Problem Solving I, 3 cr
MS&E 350 Introduction to Materials Science, 3 cr
ME 361 Engineering Thermodynamics, 3 cr
ME 363 or CEE 310 Fluid Mechanics, 3 cr
ME 364 Elementary Heat Transfer, 3 cr
ECE 376 Electrical and Electronic Circuits or Physics 321 Electrical Circuits & Electronics, 3 cr
Computing Elective, 3 cr (must be selected from an approved list available in the department office)

IV. Engineering Mechanics Core Requirement, 31 credits

EMA 201 Statics, 3 cr
EMA 202 Dynamics, 3 cr
EMA 303 Mechanics of Materials, 3 cr
EMA 307 Mechanics of Materials Lab, 1 cr
EMA 405 Practicum in Finite Elements, 3 cr
EMA 469 Design Problems in Engineering, 3 cr
EMA 506 Advanced Mechanics of Materials I, 3 cr
EMA 570 or EMA 540 or EMA 611 Exp. Mechanics or EMA 522 Aerodynamics Lab, 3 cr
EMA 521 Aerodynamics or ME 563 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics, 3 cr
EMA 542 Advanced Dynamics or EMA 545 Mechanical Vibrations, 3 cr
EMA 569 Senior Design Project, 3 cr

V. EMA Electives, 9 credits

Any EMA course numbered 500 and above.

VI. Communication Skills Requirement, 7 credits

Communications "A" Elective, 2 (must be selected from an approved list available in the department office) 
EPD 275 Technical Presentations or Com Arts 105 Public Speaking, 2 cr 
EPD 397 Technical Communication, 3 cr

VII. Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 credits

Students must take 16 credits that carry H, S, L, or Z breadth designators. These credits must fulfill the following subrequirements:

  1. A minimum of 2 courses from the same department or program. At least 1 of these 2 courses must be designated as above the elementary level (I, A, or D) in the timetable.
  2. A minimum of 6 credits designated as humanities (H, L, or Z in the course listing), and an additional minimum of 3 credits designated as social science (S or Z in the course listing). Foreign language courses count as H credits. Retroactive credits for language courses may not be used to meet the Liberal Studies credit requirement (they can be used for subrequirement 1 above).
  3. At least 3 credits in courses designated as ethnic studies (lower case “e” in the course listing). These courses may help satisfy subrequirements 1 and 2 above, but they only count once toward the total required. Note: Some courses may have “e” designation but not have H, S, L, or Z designation; these courses do not count toward the Liberal Studies requirement.

For information on credit load, adding or dropping courses, course substitutions, pass/fail, auditing courses, dean's honor list, repeating courses, probation, and graduation, see the College of Engineering Official Regulations.

VIII. Technical Electives Requirement, 3 credits

Three credits at a level that requires 2 semesters of calculus or 2 semesters of physics.

Suggested Eight-Semester Course Sequence
Freshman Year, First Semester, 15 credits

Chem 109 General Chemistry, 5 cr
Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Communications "A" Elective, 2 cr
InterEgr (EPD) 160 Introduction to Engineering, 3 cr

Second Semester, 16 credits

EMA 201 Statics, 3 cr
Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Stat 224 Statistics for Engineers, 3 cr
ME 231 Introductory Engineering Graphics, 2 cr
Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

Sophomore Year, First Semester, 17 credits

Math 234 Calculus—Functions of Several Variables, 4 cr
Physics 202 General Physics, 5 cr
EMA 202 Dynamics, 3 cr
EP 271 Engineering Problem Solving I, 3 cr
EPD 275 or Com Arts 105 Public Speaking, 2 cr

Second Semester, 16 credits

Math 319 Differential Equations, 3 cr
Physics 241 or 205 Modern Physics, 3 cr
ME 361 Engineering Thermodynamics, 3 cr
EMA 303 Mechanics of Materials, 3 cr
EMA 307 Mechanics of Materials Lab, 1 cr
Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

Junior Year, First Semester, 18 credits

EMA 506 Advanced Strength of Materials, 3 cr
EMA 542 Advanced Dynamics or
EMA 545 Mechanical Vibrations, 3 cr
Math 340 Linear Algebra, 3 cr
MS&E 350 Introduction to Materials Science, 3 cr
EPD 397 Technical Communications, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

Second Semester, 15 credits

EMA 405 Practicum in Finite Elements, 3 cr
EMA 611 or EMA 540 or EMA 570 or EMA 522, 3 cr
ME 363 or CEE 310 Fluid Mechanics, 3 cr
Computing Elective, 3 cr
Technical Electives, 3 cr

Senior Year, First Semester, 16 credits

EMA 469 Design Problems in Engineering, 3 cr
EMA 521 Aerodynamics, 3 cr
EMA Electives, 3 cr
ECE 376 Electrical Circuits, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Electives, 4 cr

Second Semester, 15 credits

EMA 569 Senior Design Project, 3 cr
EMA Electives, 6 cr
ME 364 Elementary Heat Transfer, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

Total credits required for graduation: 127

Astronautics Option in Engineering Mechanics

The astronautics option in engineering mechanics prepares students for design, development, and research, with an emphasis on applied mathematics and astronautics. Its purpose is to improve and expand the educational opportunities of students at the university who wish to pursue careers in astronautics and space-related areas. This is accomplished by providing in depth exposure to course sequences in astrodynamics, orbital mechanics, and flight dynamics, as well as a core curriculum of structural and material analysis, advanced dynamics, and vibrations. The program requires a minimum of 127 credits; students selecting this option must submit an option declaration form to the department office.

Astronautics Curriculum

The following curriculum applies to students who entered the College of Engineering after May 2001.

Summary

Mathematics/Statistics Requirement, 22 cr
Science Requirement, 13 cr
Engineering Science Requirement, 26 cr
Engineering Mechanics/Astronautics Core Requirement, 40 cr
EMA Electives, 3 cr
Communications Skills Requirement, 7 cr
Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 cr

Total Credits: 127
I. Mathematics Requirement, 22 credits

Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 234 Calculus—Functions of Several Variables, 3 cr
Math 319 Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations, 3 cr
Math 340 Elementary Matrix and Linear Algebra, 3 cr
Stat 224 Introductory Statistics for Engineers, 3 cr

II. Science Requirement, 13 credits

Chem 109 General Chemistry, 5 cr
Physics 202 General Physics, 5 cr
Physics 241 or 205 Modern Physics, 3 cr

III. Engineering Science Requirement, 26 credits

EPD 160 Introduction to Engineering, 3 cr
ME 231 Intro. Engineering Graphics, 2 cr
EP 271 Engineering Problem Solving I, 3 cr
ME 361 Engineering Thermodynamics, 3 cr
ME 363 or CEE 310 Fluid Mechanics, 3 cr
ECE 376 Electrical and Electronic Circuits, 3 cr
ME 364 Elementary Heat Transfer, 3 cr
ECE 332 or ME 446 Control Systems, 3 cr
Computing Elective, 3 cr (must be selected from an approved list available in the department office)

IV. Engineering Mechanics/Astronautics Core Requirement, 40 credits

EMA 201 Statics, 3 cr
EMA 202 Dynamics, 3 cr
EMA 303 Mechanics of Materials, 3 cr
EMA 307 Mechanics of Materials Lab, 1 cr
EMA 405 Practicum in Finite Elements, 3 cr
EMA 469 Design Problems in Engineering, 3 cr
EMA 506 Advanced Mechanics of Materials I, 3 cr
EMA 540 or EMA 570 or EMA 611 Exp. Mechanics or EMA 522 Aerodynamics Lab, 3 cr
EMA 521 Aerodynamics or ME 563 Intermediate Fluid Dynamics, 3 cr
EMA 542 Adv. Dynamics, 3 cr
EMA 545 Mech. Vibrations, 3 cr
EMA 550 Astrodynamics, 3 cr
EMA 569 Senior Design Project, 3 cr
EMA 642 Satellite Dynamics, 3 cr

V. Technical Electives, 3 credits

Students need 3 credits at an academic level that requires 2 semesters of calculus or 2 semesters of physics as prerequisite. EMA 001, Cooperative Education Program, may also be used to satisfy this requirement.

VI. Communication Skills Requirement, 7 credits

Communications "A" Elective, 2 cr (must be selected from an approved list available in the department office)
EPD 275 Technical Presentations or Com Arts 105 Public Speaking, 2 cr
EPD 397 Technical Writing, 3 cr

VII. Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 credits

Students must take 16 credits that carry H, S, L, or Z breadth designators. These credits must fulfill the following subrequirements:

  1. 1. A minimum of 2 courses from the same department or program. At least 1 of these 2 courses must be designated as above the elementary level (I, A, or D) in the timetable.
  2. 2. A minimum of 6 credits designated as humanities (H, L, or Z in the course listing), and an additional minimum of 3 credits designated as social science (S or Z in the course listing). Foreign language courses count as H credits. Retroactive credits for language courses may not be used to meet the Liberal Studies credit requirement (they can be used for subrequirement 1 above).
  3. 3. At least 3 credits in courses designated as ethnic studies (lower case “e” in the course listing). These courses may help satisfy subrequirements 1 and 2 above, but they only count once toward the total required. Note: Some courses may have “e” designation but not have H, S, L, or Z designation; these courses do not count toward the Liberal Studies requirement.
  4. For information on credit load, adding or dropping courses, course substitutions, pass/fail, auditing courses, dean's honor list, repeating courses, probation, and graduation, see the College of Engineering Official Regulations.

    Suggested Eight-Semester Course Sequence
    Freshman Year, First Semester, 15 credits

    Chem 109 General Chemistry, 5 cr
    Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
    Communications "A" Elective, 2 cr
    InterEgr (EPD) 160 Introduction to Engineering, 3 cr

    Second Semester, 16 credits

    EMA 201 Statics, 3 cr
    Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
    Stat 224 Statistics for Engineers, 3 cr
    ME 231 Introductory Engineering Graphics, 2 cr
    Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

    Sophomore Year, First Semester, 17 credits

    Math 234 Calculus—Functions of Several Variables, 4 cr
    Physics 202 General Physics, 5 cr
    EMA 202 Dynamics, 3 cr
    NE 271 Engineering Problem Solving I, 3 cr
    EPD 275 Technical Presentations or Com Arts 105 Public Speaking, 2 cr

    Second Semester, 16 credits

    Math 319 Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations, 3 cr
    Physics 241 or 205 Modern Physics, 3 cr
    ME 361 Thermodynamics, 3 cr
    EMA 303 Mechanics of Materials, 3 cr
    EMA 307 Mechanics of Materials Lab, 1 cr
    Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

    Junior Year, First Semester, 18 credits

    EMA 506 Adv. Strength of Materials, 3 cr
    EMA 405 Practicum in Finite Elements, 3 cr
    ME 363 or CEE 310 Fluid Mechanics, 3 cr
    Math 340 Elementary Matrix and Linear Algebra, 3 cr
    EPD 397 Technical Communications, 3 cr
    Liberal Studies Elective, 3 cr

    Second Semester, 15 credits

    EMA 545 Mechanical Vibrations, 3 cr
    EMA 550 Astrodynamics, 3 cr
    EMA 611 or EMA 540 or EMA 570, or EMA 522, 3 cr
    ME 364 Elementary Heat Transfer, 3 cr
    Computing Elective, 3 cr

    Senior Year, First Semester, 16 credits

    EMA 469 Design Problems in Engineering, 3 cr
    EMA 521 Aerodynamics, 3 cr
    EMA 542 Advanced Dynamics, 3 cr
    ECE 376 Electrical Circuits, 3 cr
    Liberal Studies Electives, 4 cr

    Second Semester, 15 credits

    EMA 569 Senior Design Project, 3 cr
    EMA 642 Satellite Dynamics, 3 cr
    ECE 332 or ME 446 Control Systems, 3 cr
    Technical Electives, 3 cr
    Liberal Studies Electives, 3 cr

    Total credits required for graduation: 127

    Nuclear Engineering Scholars and Distinguished Scholars Program

    Students who achieve at least a 3.0 GPA in their first semester, and maintain it throughout their career, may be designated Scholars. They also may be exempted from some formal requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering degree other than total credits. However, they must meet certain restrictions on the distribution of courses chosen. Students who achieve at least a 3.70 grade point average (GPA) for the first semester of the freshman year or a 3.5 GPA for the first four semesters, may be designated Distinguished Scholars. These students, with the approval of their advisor, may be exempted from most formal requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering degree other than the total credit hours, so long as they maintain a satisfactory performance record and the main thrust of their work is along the lines of nuclear engineering education. The general education and liberal studies requirements must be met by Scholars and Distinguished Scholars. Students transferring into the nuclear engineering department may be eligible to qualify for either of these programs as late as the beginning of the seventh semester.

    Honors in Undergraduate Research Program

    Qualified undergraduates may earn a Honors in Research designation on their transcript and diploma by completing 8 credits of undergraduate honors research, including a senior thesis. Further information is available in the department office.

    Facilities

    Facilities available for instruction and research include:

    Mechanics Holographic Lab
    Viscoelasticity and Composites Lab
    Wisconsin Laboratory for Structures and Materials Testing: Materials Testing Lab
    Structural Mechanics Lab
    Structural Dynamics and Vibrations Lab
    Fatigue/Fracture Lab
    Instructional Computing Lab (in Computer Aided Engineering)
    Research Computing Lab 
    Wisconsin Laboratory for Structures and Materials Testing: Materials Testing Lab
    Structural Mechanics Lab
    Structural Dynamics and Vibrations Lab
    Fatigue/Fracture Lab
    Instructional Computing Lab (in Computer Aided Engineering)
    Research Computing Lab