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College of Engineering

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Study Abroad in Chemical Engineering
Chemical and Biological Engineering Curriculum
Curriculum Modification for CBE
Facilities
Courses 

2014 Engineering Hall, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706; 608-262-1092; fax 608-262-5434; www.engr.wisc.edu/che

Professors Abbott (chair), de Pablo, Dumesic, Graham, Klingenberg, Kuech, Mavrikakis, Murphy, Nealey, Palecek, Rawlings, Yin; Associate Professors Lynn, Maravelias, Root, Shusta, Swaney; Assistant Professors Pfleger, Reed

Chemical engineers exploit advances in chemistry and biology to create new products, design chemical processes, develop energy resources, and protect the environment. Students receive a thorough grounding in chemistry, biology, mathematics and physics. With this broad scientific training, chemical engineers work effectively on a diverse set of problems involving chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. For example, chemical engineers develop environmentally benign and safe processes to make the chemical products that people depend on. They work in research and development laboratories, creating polymeric materials with improved performance and durability. They work in manufacturing, making vaccines and antibiotics. They invent new ways to keep our food and water supplies safe. Opportunities for chemical engineers span numerous industries: pharmaceuticals, polymers, energy, food, consumer products, biotechnology, and electronic and optical materials. Graduates understand the needs of society, and use their training in science and technology to meet those needs.

The chemical engineering program develops the student's capability for invention and analysis of chemical processes and products. Students in the program take several classes in chemistry, along with courses in physics, mathematics, and biology. The curriculum provides a rigorous education in the fundamental chemical engineering sciences of thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and kinetics, as well as more applied areas such as materials science, biochemical engineering, or chemical process design. Because engineers must be skilled communicators, the curriculum places considerable emphasis on technical report writing, team projects, and formal and informal oral presentation. In addition, students broaden their understanding of people and society by taking several courses in the humanities and social sciences.

The B.S. program in chemical engineering leads to a wide variety of careers. Graduates are prepared for professional lives in industry, government, engineering design, or consulting companies. Graduates with a more practical, hands-on approach are employed in manufacturing support, process development, product development, design, construction, or technical sales. They rapidly advance to responsible technical supervisory and management positions. Graduates with a research interest work to improve understanding of scientific engineering principles, and to apply these principles to solve emerging problems. Entrepreneurial graduates work in smaller enterprises, or create their own businesses, developing the major industries of tomorrow. An undergraduate degree in chemical engineering provides a strong basis for advanced study in graduate school, or for further training in medicine, law, or policy.

Study Abroad in Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineering students have several options to participate in engineering study programs in universities and engineering schools outside the United States. Present programs include study in Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Other placements can be arranged. In these programs course credits may be earned to fulfill certain chemical engineering degree requirements. Contact Amanda Hammitt, M1002a Engineering Centers Building, for further information.

Chemical and Biological Engineering Curriculum

The following curriculum applies to students admitted to the chemical engineering degree program.

Summary of Requirements

Mathematics Requirement, 19 cr
Physics, 10 cr
Chemistry, 20 cr
Professional Breadth, 6 cr
Life Science, 6 cr
Engineering Requirement, 48 cr
Communications Skills, 2 cr
Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 cr
Free Electives, 6 cr

Total Credits: 133

I. Mathematics Requirement, 19 credits

Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Math 234 Calculus— Functions of Several Variables, 3 cr
Math 319 Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations or Math 320 Linear Mathematics, 3 cr
Statistics 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers, 3 cr

Transfer students must have equivalent math courses to meet the calculus requirement with a minimum of 12 credits to cover the three-course basic math sequence. Any deficiency in total math credits must be made up with electives in science or engineering.

II. Science Requirement, 36 credits
A. Physics, 10 cr

Physics 201 or 207 General Physics, 5 cr
Physics 202 or 208 General Physics, 5 cr

Transfer Students who receive fewer than 6 credits for Physics 201/202 or 207/208 courses must make up the credit shortage with another Physics course.

B. Chemistry, 20 cr

Chem 109 General and Analytical Chemistry I, 5 cr
Chem 329 Fundamentals of Analytical Science, 4 cr
Chem 343 Introductory Organic Chemistry, 3 cr
Chem 344 Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab, 2 cr
Chem 345 Intermediate Organic Chemistry, 3 cr
Chem 562 Physical Chemistry, 3 cr

Transfer students whose general chemistry courses do not contain significant analytical chemistry content must take Chemistry 329 (or Chemistry 327). Credit shortages caused by transfer of freshman chemistry courses at fewer than 9 credits must be made up with chemistry, biochemistry, or chemical engineering courses.

C. Life Science, 6 cr

Introductory Biology requirement: Zool 153 (3 cr) or Zool 151 (5 cr) or the score of 5 on AP Biology exam

Advanced Biology requirement: Biochem 501 (3 cr) or Biochem 507 (3 cr) or Zool 570 (3 cr) or Gen 466 (3 cr) or Bact 303 (3 cr)

Biocore 301 and 303 may be used to satisfy the Life Sciences requirements. Students who meet the Introductory Biology requirement with an AP exam are encouraged to take two advanced biology electives.

III. Core Engineering Requirement, 48 credits

CBE 250 Process Synthesis, 3 cr
CBE 255 Introduction to Chemical Process Modeling, 3 cr
CBE 310 Chemical Process Thermodynamics, 3 cr
CBE 311 Thermodynamics of Mixtures, 3 cr
CBE 320 Introductory Transport Phenomena, 4 cr
CBE 324 Transport Phenomena Lab, 2 cr
CBE 326 Momentum and Heat Transfer Operations, 3 cr
CBE 424 Operations and Process Laboratory, 5 cr
CBE 426 Mass Transfer Operations, 3 cr
CBE 430 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design, 3 cr
Materials Elective (CBE 440 Chemical Engineering Materials, 3 cr, or
CBE 540 Polymer Science and Technology, 3 cr, or CBE 544 Processing of Electronic Materials, 3 cr, or CBE 547 Introduction to Colloid and Interface Science, 3 cr)
CBE 450 Process Design, 3 cr
CBE 470 Process Dynamics and Control, 3 cr
CBE Electives, 6 cr Engineering Elective

Chemical engineering electives may be chosen from any of the chemical engineering courses that are not required, with the exception of CBE 425. A maximum of 2 credits of co-op work (CBE 001) may be applied to meet the CBE elective requirement. BSE 542 Food Engineering Operations and BSE 642 Food & Pharmaceutical Separations can be taken as CBE elective courses. Qualified undergraduates may take graduate-level (600 or 700) courses to fulfill this requirement.

Engineering elective courses are to be selected from the College of Engineering (preferably outside chemical engineering). At least 1 of the 3 credits must be obtained from a list of approved courses in the CBE Curriculum Guide, that carry engineering topics credits.

A maximum of 6 credits of CBE 599 and/or CBE 699 may be used to satisfy the 9-credit sequence of CBE and Engineering elective courses.

IV. Professional Breadth Requirement, 6 credits

The objective of this requirement is to provide students with skills to interact with professionals from other disciplines.  Suitable courses for this requirement include courses in engineering (excluding CBE) and science, as well as a variety of other disciplines. A list of approved courses is available here.

V. Communications Skills Requirement, 2 credits

For Part A of the General Education Communication Requirement (2 cr) students must select one course with an "a" designation in "g" of the "geBLC" information in the Course Guide, such as the following: LScCom 100, Com Arts 100, EPD 155, English 100, ILS 200, or Family Comm 100. English 118 is also approved for those students required to study English as a second language. Some students will be exempt from this requirement based on their placement test scores or advanced placement in English.

CBE 424 satisfies Part B of the General Education Communication Skills Requirement.

VI. Liberal Studies Requirement, 16 credits
  1. Liberal studies elective courses must be classified as either Humanities, Social Studies, or Literature courses (identified by the letters H, S, L, or Z in "B" of the "geBLC" information in the Course Guide. At least 6 credits must have a breadth designation of Humanities (H, L, or Z), and at least 3 credits must have a designation of Social Studies (S or Z). Foreign language courses count as H credits.
  2. Among the liberal studies electives 9–12 credits must be chosen to form a concentration in one field or two closely related fields, and at least one of the courses in the concentration must be at an Intermediate or Advanced level (indicated by an I, A, or D in the L column of the "geBLC" information in the Course Guide).
  3. A minimum of 4 credits must be outside the field of concentration.
  4. A 3-credit ethnic studies course must be selected from the College of Letters & Science. Acceptable courses are identified by the letter "e" in the Course Guide. If appropriate, the ethnic studies course may be among those used to satisfy the concentration requirement.
  5. Retroactive credits may be awarded for foreign-language work done in high school. The following conditions apply:
    1. A university-level foreign language course must be taken before the student has earned 30 college credits in residence;
    2. Retroactive Language Credit Request Form must be completed and submitted to the language instructor during the first two weeks of class;
    3. The student must earn a B or better in this course.
    4. Such credits do not count toward the 16 liberal-studies credits required. They may, however, be used to satisfy the concentration and depth requirements stated in Item 2 above and count as degree credits.
  6. English composition courses, English as a Second Language Courses, and basic communications arts courses are not accepted as liberal studies electives.
VI. Free Electives, 6 credits

Students who satisfy the Communications Part A requirement by examination will have an additional 2 credits of free electives. Transfer students who receive fewer transfer credits for a required course than are given for the same course on the Madison campus must increase their free elective credits to meet the minimum 133 total credit requirement for the chemical engineering degree.

General College of Engineering Requirements and Chemical Engineering Curriculum

Prior to admission to a degree-granting program, students must complete several General College of Engineering Requirements (GCR; see this link). As part of the GCR, students must take courses in five categories (communications, physics, chemistry, introduction to engineering, and mathematics). While various courses can be selected in theses categories, students who wish to be admitted to chemical engineering are strongly encouraged to take the specific courses listed below.

General College Requirements
  1. Comm A
  2. Physics
  3. Chemistry
  4. Introduction to Engineering
  5. Mathematics
Recommended Courses
  1. EPD 155 (2 cr). Any Comm A course may be taken.
  2. Physics 201 (5 cr). EMA 201 (3 cr) plus EMA 202 (3 cr) may be substituted for Phys 201.
  3. Chem 109 (5 cr). Chem 103 (4 cr) plus Chem 104 (5 cr) may be substituted for Chem 109.
  4. InterEgr 101 (2 cr) or InterEgr 102 (2 cr) or InterEng 160 (3 cr). InterEgr 101 and 102 can count toward the department free elective or liberal elective requirements; InterEgr 160 can count toward the department professional breadth requirement. Other Intro to Engineering approved GCR (see this link) can count toward the free elective requirements.
  5. Math 217 (5 cr) may be substituted for Math 221; Math 275 (5 cr) plus Math 276 (5 cr) may be substituted for Math 221 plus Math 222).

These recommended courses present the preferred topics at a level suitable for chemical engineering students.

Other alternatives that satisfy the General College Requirements will be accepted for admission into the chemical engineering degree program, but these choices may reduce the number of free electives available in the curriculum.

Recommended Course Sequence
Freshman Year, First Semester, 15 credits

Chem 109 General and Analytical Chemistry, 5 cr
Math 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr
Communications Skills Elective, 2 cr
Liberal Studies Elective, 3 cr

Second Semester, 17 credits

Chem 329 Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, 4 cr (Chem 19 or cons inst)
Math 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 5 cr (Mat 221)
Physics 201 General Physics, 5 cr (Math 221 or cons inst)
Liberal Studies Elective, 3 cr

Sophomore Year, First Semester, 17 credits

CBE 250 Process Synthesis, 3 cr (Che 219, or con reg)
Chem 343 Introductory Organic Chemistry, 3 cr  (Chem 104 or 109)
Math 234 Calculus— Functions of Several Variables, 3 cr  (Math 222)
Physics 202 General Physics, 5 cr  (Physics 201 or equiv.)
Zool 153 Introductory Biology, 3 cr (Chem 109)

Second Semester, 17 credits

CBE 255 Introduction to Chemical Process Modeling, 3 cr (Math 319 or 320 or con reg)

CBE 310 Chemical Process Thermodynamics, 3 cr (Math 234, Phys 201 or equiv; CBE 255 or equiv or CBE 250 with grade of C or better)
Chem 344 Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab, 2 cr (Chem 341 or 343)
Chem 345 Intermediate Organic Chemistry, 3 cr  (Chem 343 with C or better)
Math 319 or 320, 3 cr (Math 222) or Math 320 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations, 3 cr
Stats 324 Intro Applied Stats for Engineers, 3 cr (Math 222)

Junior Year, First Semester, 16 credits

CBE 311 Thermodynamics of Mixtures, 3 cr (CBE 250 C or better)
CBE 320 Introductory Transport Phenomena, 4 cr
Professional Breadth Elective, 3 cr

Advanced Biology Elective, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Elective, 3 cr

Second Semester, 16 credits

CBE 324 Transport Phenomena Lab, 2 cr (CBE 310 & 320 better than a C)
CBE 326 Momentum and Heat Transfer Operations, 3 cr
Chem 562 Physical Chemistry, 3 cr
Professional Breadth Elective, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Elective, 4 cr

Senior Year, First Semester, 15 credits

CBE 426 Mass Transfer Operations, 3 cr (CBE 311 & 320)
CBE 430 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design, 3 cr
CBE Elective, 3 cr
CBE 440 Chemical Engineering Materials, 3 cr
or CBE 540 Polymer Science & Technology, 3 cr, or CBE 544 Processing of Electronic Materials, 3 cr, or CBE 547 Introduction to Colloid and Interface Science, 3 cr
Liberal Studies Elective, 3 cr

Second Semester, 15 credits

CBE 450 Process Design, 3 cr
CBE 470 Process Dynamics and Control, 3 cr
CBE Elective, 3 cr
Free Elective, 6 cr

Senior Year, Summer Session, 5 credits

CBE 424 Operations and Process Lab, 5 cr

Total credits for graduation: 133
Course Substitution Regulations
  1. Any student may, with advisor approval, replace up to 12 credits of required courses in the curriculum, except CBE 424, by an equal number of credits of other courses within the limitations listed under (3) below.
  2. Any student who wishes to amend the curriculum by more than 12 credits or wishes to appeal the advisor's decision in (1) or to request exception to (3) below must submit a written request to the chair of the department, who will bring it to the department faculty for consideration.
  3. Restrictions on course substitutions are as follows:
  1. Physics course may be replaced by science or engineering courses;
  2. Chemistry/life courses must be replaced by courses with significant chemistry/life content;
  3. Engineering courses must be replaced by engineering courses;
  4. Lab courses must be replaced by courses with an equal number of hours of lab courses;
  5. English 101, English as a second language courses, and Math 112–114 may not be used for course substitutions.

Curriculum Modification for CBE

Students wishing to specialize or to prepare for graduate study in technical or nontechnical areas may use electives and the course substitution regulations to achieve a curriculum that will enhance professional development in a particular specialty. Examples for several technical areas are listed below. Others can be found on the chemical engineering website. Several options are provided for selecting particular electives. Students interested in preparing for graduate studies in nontechnical areas should also consult with their advisor.

Bioprocess Engineering

CBE 440/540;
CBE 540/560 CBE elective: BSE 542, 642
Free electives: Genetics 466, Food Sci 550

Biomedical and Premedical

CBE 440/540: CBE 540
CBE elective: CBE 560
Engineering elective: BME 314, 401, 410, 430

Environmental Engineering

CBE 440/450: CBE 440
CBE elective: CBE 567, 535
Engineering elective: CEE 320, 326, 521, 522
Free elective: Envir St. 343, Geol 411

Polymers

CBE 440/540: CBE 440
CBE elective: CBE 540, 541, 525
Engineering elective: ME 417, 418

Process Systems and Technology Management

Engineering elective: IE 313, 433, CS 412, 513

Free elective: Math 340, 415

Food Engineering

CBE 440/550: CBE 440
CBE elective: CBE 540, 565
Engineering electives: CEE 521, 320, BSE 642
Free elective: Food Sci 410

Solid State Materials

CBE 440/450: CBE 440
CBE elective: CBE 544
Engineering electives: MSE 448, 570, ECE 335, 466
Free elective: Physics 531, 551

Facilities

Facilities available for instruction and research include:
Biochemical Process Lab Electrochemistry Lab
Plastics Lab
Process Dynamics and Control Lab
Research Labs
Transport Phenomena Lab
Unit Operations Lab
Biochemical Process Lab
Electrochemistry Lab
Plastics Lab Process
Dynamics and Control Lab
Research Labs
Transport Phenomena Lab
Unit Operations Lab