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Environmental Monitoring Program (M.S., Ph.D.)

 
Environmental Monitoring Program (M.S., Ph.D.)
 
(from UW-Madison Institute for Environmental Studies Bulletin)
 
Chair: Professor Ralph W. Kiefer. Program Committee: Professors Clapp, Kiefer,
Lillesand, McSweeney, Niemann, Scarpace, Vonderohe; Associate Professor
Yandell; Assistant Professor Ventura.
 
The Environmental Monitoring Program is an interdisciplinary graduate program
leading to a master of science (M.S.) degree in environmental monitoring and a
doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in environmental monitoring.
Begun in 1977 and administered by the Institute for Environmental Studies, the
program is one of the oldest and largest programs of its kind in the United
States.
     The Environmental Monitoring Program emphasizes the application of remote
sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) technology to natural resource
management and environmental monitoring. Although remote sensing and GIS are
increasingly sophisticated and powerful tools, in this program they are
regarded as means to an end, not ends in themselves. Rather than produce remote
sensing generalists, the aim is to prepare interdisciplinary specialists who
can apply remote sensing and GIS methods within fields they have already
chosen.
     The program draws from the many excellent instructional and research
resources in the mapping sciences available at UW-Madison. For example, digital
photogrammetry and geopositioning courses are offered by the Department of
Civil and Environmental Engineering; cartography courses are taught in the
Department of Geography; and LIS (land information studies)/GIS courses are
taught in the Institute for Environmental Studies and the Departments of Civil
and Environmental Engineering, Geography, Landscape Architecture, and Soil
Science.
     In addition to a substantial number of tool-oriented courses, the
university offers a broad array of courses on natural resources and the
environment and/or concerned with the institutional structures within which
remote sensing and GIS data are used. The university also offers courses on
such topics as earth system science, landscape ecology, biophysical modeling,
conservation biology, and global change. Students are encouraged to draw on
this broad spectrum of instructional resources and tailor their programs to
their individual interests.
 
 
INTEGRATION OF INSTRUCTION AND RESEARCH
Most students in the Environmental Monitoring Program are based at IES's
Environmental Remote Sensing Center (ERSC), where instruction and research
proceed hand-in-hand. Some of the program's courses are taught using ERSC
facilities, and the thesis research of virtually every student in the program
either is funded through ERSC or involves the use of ERSC's state-of-the-art
equipment.
     ERSC conducts research to improve the acquisition and analysis of remotely
sensed data and to apply remote sensing techniques and GIS methods to the
measurement, understanding, and management of earth resources. The center uses
remote sensing tools, particularly digital image data from advanced sensors
aboard earth-orbiting satellites, and GIS technology to inventory and monitor
natural resources accurately and repeatedly over large geographic areas.
     ERSC was a pioneer in the development of microcomputer image-processing
software. The center operates an extensive network of specialized work stations
that can store, retrieve, process, and analyze digital image data rapidly. It
also possesses a broad array of hardware and software to support its research
in GIS applications. A network link to UW-Madison's Space Science and
Engineering Center enables the center to acquire "real-time" data from
satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
 
 
CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Students are expected to enter the Environmental Monitoring Program with depth
in at least one academic discipline. Backgrounds in natural science and
engineering are most common, but backgrounds in physical planning and/or design
fields such as landscape architecture or urban and regional planning also are
appropriate. Applicants with other backgrounds may be considered for admission
with deficiencies.
     One semester of college-level calculus, two semesters of college-level
statistics, and one semester of computer science are among the analytical and
research requirements for a master's degree. Additional statistics and computer
science courses are required for a doctorate. Students are strongly advised to
take these courses before entering the Environmental Monitoring Program but
can, if necessary, complete the requirements promptly after enrolling in the
program.
     The Environmental Monitoring Program requires specific courses to enhance
students' depth and breadth of knowledge, capacity for interdisciplinary
synthesis and analysis, and analytical and research skills.
     Depth courses cover such topics as fundamentals of remote sensing, remote
sensing digital image processing, remote sensing image interpretation, land and
geographic information systems, air photo interpretation, photogrammetry,
remote sensing instrumentation, remote sensing and GIS computer algorithms,
computer cartography, and related areas.
     Breadth courses are environmentally related courses that address such
subjects as environmental decision-making, environmental ethics, environmental
systems concepts, modeling and analysis of environmental systems, science and
government, analysis of environmental impact, and global sustainability.
     Interdisciplinary synthesis and analysis is emphasized in the
Environmental Monitoring Seminar, a weekly colloquium of student presentations,
guest lectures, and group discussion. Each student also completes a
multidisciplinary practicum. The practicum is an intensive, two-semester team
project requiring the use of remote sensing and GIS methods to solve a "real
world" environmental problem or conduct a natural resource assessment.
     The analytical and research skills requirement calls for course work in
mathematics, statistics, and computer science. A one-semester topics course in
program orientation, research methods, and professional orientation also is
required.
     A thesis is required of all master's and doctoral students.
 
 
MASTER'S CURRICULUM
Each master's student must complete at least 24 credits of graduate course work
(including seminars, but excluding analytical and research skills courses) plus
a thesis. Courses already taken to fulfill the requirements of a bachelor's
degree may be counted, in part, toward the depth, breadth, and analytical and
research skills requirements.
 
     DEPTH REQUIREMENT. 21 credits from approved list. Up to 9 credits of
     undergraduate work may be applied toward this requirement.
 
     BREADTH REQUIREMENT. 6 credits from approved list. Up to 3 credits of
     undergraduate work may be applied toward this requirement.
 
     INTERDISCIPLINARY SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS. 8 credits minimum during
     graduate enrollment, including Envir St 765-766 Environmental Monitoring
     Practicum (6 credits) and at least two semesters of Envir St/Civ Engr 950
     Environmental Monitoring Seminar (1 credit per semester). Full-time
     students must enroll for credit in the Environmental Monitoring Seminar
     every semester they are on campus. Students registered for 6 or fewer
     credits must enroll for credit in this seminar at least once every
     academic year. Students also must enroll (for credit or audit) in a
     different seminar for one semester to broaden the disciplinary content of
     their program.
 
     ANALYTICAL AND RESEARCH SKILLS REQUIREMENT. If possible, analytical skills
     courses should be completed before entry into the program. But master's
     students may take these courses while enrolled in the program. Students
     must take Envir St 900 Topics in Environmental Monitoring (1 credit) while
     in the program.
 
     FIELD WORK involving environmental measurements is required. This can be
     performed in connection with course work, practica, seminars, or thesis
     research.
 
     THESIS. Each master's student must complete a thesis.
 
     CERTIFICATION. A written course program must be presented to the student's
     major professor for review by the certification committee no later than
     the sixth week of the student's second semester in the master's program.
 
     COHERENCE. Each student must submit a written course program and
     preliminary thesis proposal to her/his advisory committee for approval
     before taking an interim examination.
 
     EXAMINATIONS. Each student must take an interim examination no later than
     one semester before completing the degree. A final examination also is
     required. Examinations may be written, oral, or both, as determined by the
     student's advisory committee.
 
 
DOCTORAL CURRICULUM
Each doctoral student must complete at least 42 credits of graduate course work
(including seminars, but excluding analytical and research skills courses) plus
a thesis. Courses already taken to fulfill the requirements of a master's
degree may be counted, in part, toward the 42-credit minimum. Courses already
taken to fulfill the requirements of a bachelor's degree may be counted, in
part, toward the depth, breadth, and analytical and research skills
requirements. Every student is expected to complete a master's degree with a
research thesis before pursuing a doctorate. Applicants may be asked to submit
copies of their M.S. theses and/or publications in which they have played a
major role to facilitate evaluation of their application to the doctoral
program.
 
     DEPTH REQUIREMENT. 30 credits from approved list. Up to 15 credits of
     undergraduate work may be applied toward this requirement.
 
     AREA OF CONCENTRATION. 9 credits. A group of discipline/tool-oriented
     courses. It must be coherent (focused) to be approved by the student's
     committee, and all 9 credits must be taken during graduate enrollment.
 
     BREADTH REQUIREMENT. 9 credits from approved list. Up to 3 credits of
     undergraduate work may be applied toward this requirement.
 
     INTERDISCIPLINARY SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS. 12 credits minimum during
     graduate enrollment. Students are expected to complete Envir St 765-766
     Environmental Monitoring Practicum (6 credits), at least four semesters of
     Envir St/Civ Engr 950 Environmental Monitoring Seminar (1 credit per
     semester), and two semesters of other seminars (2 credits) to broaden the
     disciplinary content of their program. Full-time students must enroll for
     credit in the Environmental Monitoring Seminar every semester. Students
     registered for 6 or fewer credits are required to enroll for credit in
     this seminar at least once every academic year.
 
     ANALYTICAL AND RESEARCH SKILLS REQUIREMENT. If possible, analytical skills
     courses should be completed before entry into the program. But doctoral
     students may take these courses while enrolled in the program. Students
     must take Envir St 900 Topics in Environmental Monitoring (1 credit) while
     in the program.
 
     FIELD WORK involving environmental measurements is required. This can be
     performed in connection with course work, practica, seminars, or thesis
     research.
 
     THESIS. Each doctoral student must complete a dissertation.
 
     CERTIFICATION. A written course program must be presented to the student's
     major professor for review by the certification committee no later than
     the sixth week of the student's second semester in the doctoral program.
 
     COHERENCE. A written course program proposal must be submitted to the
     student's advisory committee for approval before the student's qualifying
     examination.
 
     EXAMINATIONS. Qualifying, preliminary, and final examinations are required
     for a doctorate. The qualifying examination takes place after
     approximately one academic year of graduate work beyond the master's
     degree or equivalent. The student takes the preliminary examination no
     sooner than three months after passing the qualifying exam. Examinations
     may be oral, written, or both, as determined by the student's advisory
     committee.
 
 
DEPTH REQUIREMENT
 
Required Introductory Core Courses. 10 credits for master's degree or
doctorate.
 
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Civ Engr)
301 Introduction to Aerial Photographic Systems (also Envir St, Forestry, Geol
     Engr), 1 credit
302 Introduction to Electro-optical and Microwave Remote Sensing Systems (also
     Envir St, Forestry, Geol Engr), 1 credit
303 Introduction to Remote Sensing Digital Image Processing (also Envir St,
     Forestry, Geol Engr), 1 credit
304 Remote Sensing Visual Image Interpretation and GIS Integration (also Envir
     St, Forestry, Geol Engr), 1 credit
307 Fundamental Computations for Land Information Systems, 1 credit
308 Spatial Frameworks for Land Information Systems, 1 credit
403 Geometric Analysis of Vertical Aerial Photographs (also Envir St,
     Forestry), 1 credit
 
Geography or Landscape Architecture (Geog or Land Arc)
Geog 377 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, 4 credits, or Land
     Arc 655 Computerized Land Information Systems (also Civ Engr, Envir St), 3
     credits
Required Advanced Core Courses. 6 credits for master's degree, 9 credits for
     doctorate.
Environmental Studies/Geography/Civil and Environmental Engineering (Envir
     St/Geog/Civ Engr)
Envir St 556 Remote Sensing Image Interpretation (also Civ Engr, Land Arc), 3
     credits
Envir St 758 Image Processing Algorithms for Remote Sensing (also Civ Engr),
     and (for Ph.D.)/or (for M.S.) Envir St 695 Applications of Geographic
     Information Systems in Natural Resources (also Soil Sci, Land Arc), or
     Geog 579 GIS and Cartographic Analysis, or Civ Engr 656 Engineering
     Applications of Land and Geographic Information Systems, 3 credits.
     (Explanation: Master's students must take only one of these four courses.
     Doctoral students must take both Envir St 758 and one of the other three.)
     Any of these courses taken other than to meet the requirements are counted
     as depth electives.
 
Elective Courses. 5 credits for master's degree, 11 credits for doctorate.
 
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Civ Engr)
309 Introduction to U.S. Public Land System, 1 credit
404 Mapping With Aerial Photographs, 1 credit
405 Digital Photogrammetry, 1 credit
406 Remote Sensing Instrumentation (also Envir St), 1 credit
407 Adjustments for Land Information and Surveying, 1 credit
408 Adjustments for Control Surveying Networks, 1 credit
450 Surveying, 3 credits
452 Geopositioning: Satellite and Inertial Surveys, 3 credits
453 Geodesy, 3 credits
458 Geodetic Surveying, 3 credits
551 Advanced Photogrammetry, 3 credits
555 Airphoto Interpretation for Terrain Evaluation, 3 credits
656 Engineering Applications of Land and Geographic Information Systems, 3
     credits
750 Analytical Photogrammetry, 3 credits
 
Computer Sciences (Comp Sci)
367 Introduction to Data Structures (required in analytical and research skills
     category for Ph.D.), 3 credits
458 Computer Graphics, 3 credits
460 Artificial Intelligence Programming Languages and Tools, 3 credits
540 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, 3-4 credits
562 Expert Systems: Design and Implementation, 3 credits
564 Data Base Management Systems, 3-4 credits
731 Advanced Artificial Intelligence, 3 credits
766 Computer Vision, 3 credits
 
Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)
532 Theory and Applications of Pattern Recognition, 3 credits
533 Image Processing, 3 credits
 
Geography (Geog)
370 Introduction to Cartography, 3-4 credits
375 Introduction to Computer Cartography, 4 credits
377 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, 4 credits
572 Graphic Design in Cartography, 4 credits
575 Advanced Computer Cartography, 3 credits
576 Map Transformations and Coordinate Systems, 3 credits
578 Digital Image Mapping, 3 credits
579 GIS and Cartographic Analysis, 3 credits
 
Environmental Studies (Envir St)
695 Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources (also
     Soil Sci, Land Arc), 3 credits
 
Landscape Architecture (Land Arc)
655 Computerized Land Information Systems (also Civ Engr, Envir St), 3 credits
 
BREADTH REQUIREMENT. Six credits of environmentally related course work from
the following lists are required for a master's degree; 9 credits are required
for a doctorate. Up to 3 credits of undergraduate course work may be applied
toward this requirement. Students must take at least one course from Group A
(environmental sciences) and one course from Group B (social sciences).
 
Group A: Environmental Sciences
 
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Atm Ocn)
601 Challenging Problems in Atmospheric Science: Modelling the Earth System, 3
     credits
 
Botany
422 Plant Geography, 3 credits
 
Environmental Studies (Envir St)
300 Environmental Management (also Land Arc, Conserv), 3 credits
315 Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources (also Zoology), 2 credits
324 Soils and Environmental Pollution (also Soil Sci), 3 credits
325 Analysis of the Physical Environment (also Geog), 4 credits
336 Our Hazardous Environment (also Geog), 3 credits
361 Wetlands Ecology (also Land Arc), 3 credits
411 Energy Resources (also Geology), 3 credits
461 Environmental Systems Concepts (also Botany, Forestry), 3 credits
462 Environmental Systems Methods (also Botany, Forestry), 3 credits
502 Air Pollution and Human Health (also Prev Med), 3 credits
507 People, Chemicals, Environment (also Env Tox, Prev Med), 3 credits
575 Analysis of Environmental Impact, 3 credits
651 Conservation Biology (also Botany, Wl Ecol, Zoology), 3 credits
710, Field Investigations in Wetland Ecology, 3 credits
750 Problems in Oceanography (also Atm Ocn, Geology, Zoology), 3 credits
     Soil Science (Soil Sci)
315 Soils and Land Use Planning, 3 credits
 
 
Group B: Social Sciences
 
Agricultural Economics (Ag Econ)
343 Environmental Economics (also Envir St/Econ), 3 credits
431 Natural Resource Economics, 3 credits
567 Public Finance in Less Developed Countries, 3 credits
 
Business
332 Real Estate Law, 3 credits
550 The Real Estate Process, 3 credits
719 Public Utilities, 3 credits
 
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Civ Engr)
454 Cadastral Systems, 2 credits
455 Legal Aspects of Land Surveying, 3 credits
 
Environmental Studies (Envir St)
339 Environmental Conservation (also Geog), 4 credits
368 Environmental Law, Toxic Substances, and Conservation (also Env Tox, Pl
     Path), 2 credits
441 Environmental Ethics (also Philos), 3 credits
449 Government and Natural Resources (also Poli Sci, Urb R Pl), 3 credits
453 Aesthetics of the Natural Environment (also Philos), 3 credits
512 Science and Government (also Geology and Poli Sci), 4 credits
523 Philosophical Problems of the Biological Sciences (also Philos), 3 credits
525 Forest Policy and Multi-Resource Management (also Forestry), 3 credits
537 Culture and the Environment (also Geog), 4 credits
668 Green Politics: Global Experience, American Prospects (also Urb R Pl), 3
     credits
671 Energy Economics (also Ag Econ, Business, Econ, Urb R Pl), 3 credits
730 Local Resource Policy Analysis (also Land Arc), 3 credits
881 Benefit-Cost Analysis (also Pub Affr, Ag Econ), 3 credits
 
Law
724 Property, 5 credits
830 Land Use Controls, 3 credits
834 Local Government Law, 3 credits
846 Environmental Litigation, 3 credits
848 Environmental Law and Institutions, 3 credits
 
Urban and Regional Planning (Urb R Pl)
312 Regional Development and Planning, 3 credits
464 Planning for Human Settlements in Developing Countries, 3 credits
821 Resource Policy Issues (also Envir St), 2-3 credits
843 Land Use Policy and Planning (also Envir St), 3 credits
 
 
Special Topics. Envir St 400 Special Topics in Environmental Studies, 1-4
credits (Topics differ every semester. The certification committee considers
every topic and places it, if appropriate, into Group A or B of the breadth
electives.)
 
Analytical and Research Skills Requirement
     Mathematics. One semester of college-level calculus is required (Math 211
or 221 is appropriate). Also, a course in linear algebra is recommended.
     Statistics. Two semesters of college-level statistics are required for a
master's degree (Stat 571 and 572 are appropriate). Three semesters of
college-level statistics are required for a doctorate.
     Computer Sciences. One semester of computer sciences is required for a
master's degree (Comp Sci 302 or equivalent; Pascal and C language emphasis).
Two semesters of computer sciences are required for a doctorate, including Comp
Sci 302 (or equivalent) and Comp Sci 367 (Data Structures), or equivalent.
     Topics in Environmental Monitoring. One semester of Envir St 900 Topics in
Environmental Monitoring (1 credit), is required. This course provides an
orientation to the requirements of the program, an introduction to research
methods, and a survey of professional activities and employment opportunities
in remote sensing and geographic information systems.
 
 
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
Students must maintain at least a B (3.0 grade-point) average and meet the
Graduate School residence requirement. A student who falls below a 3.0
grade-point average is placed on probation and must achieve a cumulative
grade-point average of at least 3.0 in the subsequent semester.
     Grades of B or better are required in all courses taken to fulfill the
depth and interdisciplinary synthesis requirements. Grades for courses in other
categories may be lower than B but must be balanced by higher grades so that
the overall grade-point average in each category is at least 3.0.
 
 
MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING
 
Students earning doctorates in other fields at UW-Madison can minor in
environmental monitoring provided they abide by the regulations of the Graduate
School. A student's minor professor is selected by mutual agreement between
professor and student or through arrangements made with the help of the chair
of the Environmental Monitoring Program.
     The following are required for a minor (Graduate School Option A) in
environmental monitoring. Any variation in this curriculum must be approved by
the program committee of the Environmental Monitoring Program. Introductory
courses in remote sensing or geographic information systems often are
prerequisites for these courses.
 
REQUIRED COURSE
 
Environmental Studies (Envir St)
950 Environmental Monitoring Seminar (also Civ Engr) (enrollment required for
     at least one semester), 1 credit
 
ELECTIVE COURSES. 9 credits required
 
Environmental Studies (Envir St)
695 Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources (also
     Land Arc, Soil Sci), Land Arc 755 Methods in Land Information Systems, or
     Civ Engr 656 Engineering Applications of Land and Geographic Information
     Systems, 3 credits
556 Remote Sensing Image Interpretation (also Civ Engr, Land Arc), 3 credits
758 Image Processing Algorithms for Remote Sensing (also Civ Engr), 3 credits
765 Environmental Monitoring Practicum I and Envir St 766 Environmental
     Monitoring Practicum II, 6 credits
 
Geography (Geog)
579 GIS and Cartographic Analysis, 3 credits.
 
ID: UPBES-4.2.


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